Behavioral Accounting

Behavioral Accounting

A form of accounting that attempts to value key personnel such as executives or technicians. That is, behavioral accounting places a number on what an important person in the company can contribute and includes this as an asset. As with other intangible assets, this can be extremely difficult, but it can result in a more accurate picture of a company's worth. It is also called human resource accounting.
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CPA, is associate professor at the School of Accountancy DePaul University, in Chicago and president of the Gary Siegel Organization, an opinion research and behavioral accounting firm.
Siegel's areas of expertise are in behavioral accounting and management accounting.
His passion for research in Behavioral Accounting stems from his extensive experience in the public accounting industry; a topic that he hopes his research and forthcoming publications will help to build the knowledge base for professional service industries for years to come.
Nevertheless, it seems reasonable to anticipate that the increasing attention being devoted to behavioral accounting research will produce new and valuable insights into the problems discussed in these pages.
A second reason that may explain the lack of interest by accountants in the behavioral aspects of accounting is that very little of the literature of behavioral accounting provides any workable guides to action.
We can hope that eventually research in behavioral accounting will provide some rather specific answers to this question.
CPA, is associate professor at the School of Accountancy, DePaul University, in Chicago and president of the Gary Siegel Organization, an opinion research and behavioral accounting firm.
Professor Braun's interests include business valuation issues, auditing and behavioral accounting.
Professor Merchant won the American Accounting Association's (AAA's) awards for Notable Contributions to both the Behavioral Accounting (2004) and Management Accounting Literatures (1991-92), the AAA Outstanding Service Award (2003), and the Institute of Management Accountants' Lybrand Gold Medal Award (best paper of the year published in Management Accounting) (1989-90).
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