Before-tax contributions

Before-tax contributions

The portion of an employee's salary contributed to a retirement plan before federal income taxes are deducted; this reduces the individual's gross income for federal tax purposes.

Before-Tax Contributions

Contributions made to a retirement plan with taxable withdrawals. That is, when one makes before-tax contributions to a retirement plan, one does not pay taxes on the contributions in the year they are made, but defers taxation until one begins to make withdrawals from the plan. One makes before-tax contributions to traditional IRAs and most 401(k)s. See also: After-tax contributions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Section 125 plans also allow employees to make before-tax contributions to personal spending accounts that can be used for qualifying health-care or child-care expenses.
To determine the benefits of one type of IRA in contrast to another, equal before-tax contributions into portfolios with the same returns must be considered.
Therefore, for equivalent before-tax contributions, the Traditional IRA is better if the income earner is currently in a higher tax bracket than anticipated after retirement
Because equivalent before-tax contributions result in equivalent after-tax withdrawals for individuals in the same tax bracket before and after retirement, the Roth IRA has no advantage over the Traditional IRA.
First, in a client's early saving years when he/she is earning less money and is in a low tax bracket, the Roth provides higher withdrawals during retirement than the Traditional for the same before-tax contributions (because the Roth locks the payment and related gains into the current tax rate).
Eighty-five percent of participants in the sample made only before-tax contributions to their plans, and 97 percent of all dollars contributed by employees were contributed on a before-tax basis.
Before-tax contribution activity varied among participants.
For individuals with salaries above $80,000, before-tax contribution rates (though not the amounts contributed) tended to fall as salaries rose because IRC, and possibly plan sponsor, contribution limits became binding for some participants.
A SAR SEP allows employees to make their own before-tax contributions towards retirement.
The main disadvantage of these plans, according to Rosen, is that you must follow all the IRS guidelines that govern them, as is the case for any IRS-qualified, before-tax contribution plan.
A 401(k) plan allows employees to save and invest for their own retirement by making before-tax contributions through a cash or deferred compensation arrangement.
Before-tax contributions retirement savings plan, such as a 401(k), 403(k), or 457, are other methods workers save for retirement.