Beehive

(redirected from Beehives)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Beehives: beekeeping

Beehive

In the United Kingdom, a slang term for 5 pounds. The term derives from Cockney rhyming slang: beehive rhymes with five.
References in classic literature ?
A dog-kennel and a beehive stood outside, like symbols of old English country-life; the moon was rising behind a plantation of prosperous pear trees, the dog that came out of the kennel was reverend-looking and reluctant to bark; and the plain, elderly man-servant who opened the door was brief but dignified.
When Father Brown reached the house with the beehive and the drowsy dog, a small and neat maid-servant showed him into the dining-room, where Boulnois sat reading by a shaded lamp, exactly as his wife described him.
I shall take her up to tea at the Beehive Tavern, if I may.
Miss Bartlett and Minnie are coming with me to tea at the Beehive.
Tea at the Beehive apparently involved a complete change of apparel.
Snagsby, sitting up with her head in a perfect beehive of curl-papers and night-cap, who has dispatched Guster to the police-station with official intelligence of her husband's being made away with, and who within the last two hours has passed through every stage of swooning with the greatest decorum.
Readers of poetry see the factory-village and the railway, and fancy that the poetry of the landscape is broken up by these; for these works of art are not yet consecrated in their reading; but the poet sees them fall within the great Order not less than the beehive or the spider's geometrical web.
One could divine by the ray of a tiny light the sort of hut in the form of a beehive where the ferryman of cows took refuge at night.
The longer he thought about it, the more repugnant became the thought of taking human life needlessly; and thus it happened that while he was trying to decide just what to do, they had come to a little clearing, at the far side of which lay a palisaded village of beehive huts.
It is composed of mud and bits of straw, and has strong thick walls: in shape it precisely resembles an oven, or depressed beehive.
Concluding to set myself in the warm summer air next-- seeing that what is good for old claret is equally good for old age-- I took up my beehive chair to go out into the back court, when I was stopped by hearing a sound like the soft beating of a drum, on the terrace in front of my lady's residence.
On my side, I returned to my beehive chair, and set myself down on the sunny side of the court, and fell