Beatrice Webb


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Related to Beatrice Webb: Sidney Webb

Beatrice Webb

A British economist who lived from 1858 to 1943. She was a supporter of social reform in Britain, writing in favor of trade unions and against the poor conditions of homes in certain parts of London. In 1909, Webb recommended that Britain adopt a welfare state. She was an early theorist regarding co-ops and is credited with creating the term collective bargaining. She also co-founded the London School of Economics. See also: Beveridge Report.
References in periodicals archive ?
The story of Beatrice Webb is a neglected but fascinating tale that reads like a Jane Austen novel in Nasar's romantic and absorbing account.
Sidney and Beatrice Webb, English Poor Law Policy (London, 1910) p.
From a different perspective, this tradition was also attacked by a number of other scholars, including Sidney and Beatrice Webb.
Duranty lied, but did Beatrice Webb actually disbelieve the famine reports?
Sidney Webb and Beatrice Webb, The Parish and the County, English Local Government (London, 1963), pp.
Katherine's Building in Stepney, relating his findings to the ledger kept by Beatrice Webb and Ella Pyecroft as rent collectors in the same tenement from 1885-1890.
She visited Russia with Beatrice Webb, and she enabled John Bowlby to set up his famous Tavistock Clinic.
In 1932 he toured the Soviet Union and, while impressed with the many "official" successes of Russian public health, he nevertheless remained sceptical of Communist goals and methods (as indeed he had been suspicious of the motivations of Sidney and Beatrice Webb, who earlier constantly tried to influence his thoughts and deeds).
It profiles twenty-one women ranging from Harriet Martineau and Beatrice Webb, who are sometimes recognized as important figures in the social sciences, to Marie de Gournay (1565-1645) and Germaine de Stael (17661817) who wrote (now) little-known methodological studies or practical applications of empirical methods from the seventeenth through the nineteenth centuries.
The absence of such a system (or rather its very uneven application, for occasionally there are pseudonyms used that allow the reader to follow a number of individual women's stories) would be easier to overlook if Barrett-Ducrocq had not already shaken the reader's confidence by making some peculiar claims in the introductory chapter (listing Beatrice Webb as a "housing reformer" is one example).
Beatrice Webb was the co-founder of both the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and the Fabian movement.
One hundred years ago, a formidable social researcher called Beatrice Webb (who later, with her husband, Sidney, founded the London School of Economics and the New Statesman magazine) led a review of Britain's poor laws which resulted in a report that many claim sowed the seeds of what became our welfare state.