bear market

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Related to Bear markets: bull market

Bear market

Any market in which prices exhibit a declining trend. For a prolonged period, usually falling by 20% or more.

Bear Market

A situation in which a large number of indices lose a significant percentage of their value over the medium or long term. While there is no hard-and-fast definition of a bear market, many analysts consider a 20% loss in the Dow Jones Industrial Average or the S&P 500 to be a good rule of thumb. It is difficult to make a positive return on stocks during a bear market, and some investors move into bonds. This leads to the sale of more stocks, and the bear market can become self-sustaining. Technical analysts attempt to find the bottom of bear markets and identify buy signals, but this is risky. A bear market is different from a recession, but one can lead to the other. See also: Bull market.

bear market

An extended period of general price declines in an individual security or other asset, such as silver or real estate; a group of securities; or the securities market as a whole. Nevertheless, even during widespread bear markets, it is possible to have bull markets in particular stocks or groups of stocks. For example, stocks of gold-related companies often move against major trends in the security markets. Compare bull market.

Bear market.

A bear market is sometimes described as a period of falling securities prices and sometimes, more specifically, as a market where prices have fallen 20% or more from the most recent high.

A bear market in stocks is triggered when investors sell off shares, generally because they anticipate worsening economic conditions and falling corporate profits.

A bear market in bonds is usually the result of rising interest rates, which prompts investors to sell off older bonds paying lower rates.

bear market

a situation in which the prices of FINANCIAL SECURITIES (stocks, shares, etc.) or COMMODITIES (tin, wheat, etc.) tend to fall as a result of persistent selling and only limited buying. See SPECULATION. Compare BULL MARKET.

bear market

a situation where the prices of FINANCIAL SECURITIES (stocks, shares, etc.) or COMMODITIES (tin, wheat, etc.) are tending to fall as a result of persistent selling and only limited buying. See SPECULATOR. Compare BULL MARKET.
References in periodicals archive ?
By definition, a bear market is when the stock market falls for a prolonged period of time, usually by twenty percent or more.
His interpretation of the Dow Theory did a better job of navigating the 2007-2009 bear market and subsequent bull market than any of the nearly 200 other stock market timing strategies monitored by the Hulbert Financial Digest.
In other words, there were only four cyclical bear markets in Japan in the 39 years from 1950 to 1989, with the average loss being 41 percent and the average duration being 20 months.
The defense in a bear market is to build a diverse portfolio of value and growth mutual funds, individual stocks, and bonds, and to keep your cash in a high-yield money market," explains Richmond Heights, California-based financial advisor Joyce Muse-Harris.
In a bull market, the overall trend is up and the opposite is true for a bear market.
com, Sadana traces the worst bear markets of the past century to expose signs of false rallies and help stock market investors avoid establishing long positions in the markets too prematurely before the bear market ends.
Fundamentally, if you are able to interpret the signs and then react quickly enough to spread bet accordingly, a bear market does not necessarily mean a disastrous loss.
But for an investor who has maintained a properly diversified portfolio, structured for long-term growth, the correct reaction to the bear market is likely to be none, says Edelman in the report, titled Don't Just Do Something, Stand There
As Zander and fellow presenters pointed out, annuities are the only financial product that can avoid the devastation a bear market can wreak early in retirement, and that can keep on paying no matter how long the investor lives.
Consider dumping speculative stocks that have underperformed in a bull market because they probably won't do well in a bear market, Carlson said.
In summary, bear markets generate and then punish optimism, just as bull markets generate and then punish pessimism.
2 /PRNewswire/ -- The bear market is over, concluded a panel of investment experts at IMPACT '98, the eighth annual conference for fee-based advisors sponsored by Schwab Institutional, a division of Charles Schwab & Co.