bear raid

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Bear raid

In the context of general equities, attempt by investors to move the price of a stock opportunistically by selling large numbers of shares short. The investors pocket the difference between the initial price and the new, lower price after this maneuver. This technique is illegal under SEC rules, which stipulate that every short sale must be on an uptick.

Bear Raid

The practice of short selling a stock and spreading unfavorable news (which may or may not be true) about the company. That is, a bear raid occurs when one borrows a security, sells it, and attempts to push the security's price downward. This would result in a significant profit on the short sale. While it was a popular speculative investment strategy in the early 1900s, it is not illegal.

bear raid

A concerted effort to drive down the price of a stock by selling many shares short. The bear raid was popular among speculators in the early 1900s. Such a raid would frequently be accompanied by unfavorable rumors and stories about the target firm that would be planted in business publications. The goal of the raid was to involve other investors in a selling stampede that would drive the stock's price down to a bargain level.
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For example, though less than 1/4 of the Miscreants' Ball conference call had even been about Overstock, and the remaining 3/4 concerned the modern bear raid, CNBC aggressively distorted the former and refused to mention (or allow mention of) the latter.
The only light relief came from Simon Chalkwell, known in the stock market as Evil Knievel because of his daring bear raids on shares that he believes to be over-rated.
WAGNER'S not the only one celebrating - Slickers are too, after seeing off one of the most daring bear raids in corporate history.
Vulchev has thus snubbed the calls by residents of the Smolyan District in the Rhodope Mountains that a high number of bears in the region must be hunted down because of the recent killer bear raids, which claimed one life.