Basel Convention

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Basel Convention

A treaty intended to reduce the transfer of hazardous waste across international lines, especially between developed countries and the developing world. Hazardous waste is defined in the treaty as anything considered hazardous waste in the country in which it originated. Interestingly, it does not deal with radioactive waste. It was signed in 1989 and went into effect in 1992.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even then, many environmental groups and undeveloped nations believed that the terms of the Basel Convention were too weak, and in 1995, protests led to an amendment to the Basel Convention known as the Basel Ban Amendment (the Basel Ban).
The Basel Action Network states that "without the Basel Ban [a treaty banning exports of hazardous waste from rich nations to poor], poorer global communities would be transformed via the 'impeccable logic' of the free market into 'toxic colonies of the rich and most wasteful nations'" (Basel Action Network 1999).
Although technically in effect, the Convention remains unratified by the United States, as does the later Basel Ban Amendment to prohibit (not simply reduce) exports of hazardous wastes from specific developed countries to developing ones.
Further, in 1995 the convention adopted an amendment known as the Basel Ban, which, if enacted, will ban the export of any hazardous waste for any reason from the 29 wealthiest nations of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to any non-OECD nation.
This includes an amendment know as the Basel Ban prohibiting developed countries from exporting hazardous material to industrializing nations like India.
This historic global waste trade ban has yet to gain the necessary ratifications to enter into force, but Mozambique waste trade authorizations pose a serious threat to that process and could render the landmark Basel Ban a paper tiger.
Committed to Basel Ban Amendments: Hazardous electronic waste will not be incinerated; be placed into solid waste landfills; or be exported to developing countries
The NRC's new Rule on Import and Export of Radioactive Waste is designed to "reflect the principles" of the IAEA Code of Practice but not the Basel ban.
A number of Latin American countries have moved to ban imports of hazardous wastes under the Basel Ban Amendments - but this is causing some intra-market distortions, according to "Recycling & Solid Waste in Latin America, 2002 Update" published this month by Raymond Communications, Inc.
Just weeks before the Third Conference of Parties, the Indian government announced it was reconsidering the Basel Ban and might continue to allow hazardous waste imports for recycling into India.