Base Pay


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Base Pay

The salary one earns to which one may add through good job performance. For example, a company may hire a sales representative with a low base pay plus a commission on each sale made. Base pay allows an employee to continue to make a living during slow times, but generally is low enough to incentivize performance.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the measures we are taking across the group is a general freeze to base pay for 2015, with only a few exceptions for specific circumstances around the world," Dudley added.
A pool of $20,000 to raise the base pay of her assistants, including former Bears All-American Jackie Stiles, was given through university funds.
6 percent increases in base pay but saw reductions in total compensation of 2.
Banks have made similar moves to increase base pay, but none have so far have reported hikes as dramatic as the one Chenault is due to receive from the largest U.
Craig Huke, chief financial officer, received a base pay of $215,000 and merit-based compensation totaling $410,384; Robert L.
Eastman Chemical Company today announced it will reduce its workforce and reduce base pay for US employees as part of its push to reduce costs by more than $100 million in response to the ongoing global economic recession.
The survey found a "Confidential" clearance increases base pay by an average of 3%; a "Secret" clearance, 13%; "Top Secret" or "Top Secret/SAP," 14%; and "Top Secret Polygraph," 23%.
However, prices for food, gas, rent, clothing and many more expenses have also gone up significantly since 2004, the last time minimum-wage earners saw an increase to their base pay.
According to the agency, "Negotiations stalled on the issue of base pay and two types of premium pay that together have escalated the average controller's salary and benefits to over $170,000 annually" since the last contract was signed in 1998.
In terms of retirement, the committee recommends: vesting members at 10 rather than 20 years; paying graduated retirement plans ranging from 25 percent of base pay at 10 years to 100 percent of base pay at 40 years; establishing a Thrift Savings Plan with government contributions of 5 to 10 percent of base pay; providing "gate pays" at specific service milestones, as determined by the individual services; and delaying payment of the retirement annuity until age 60.
5 weeks of pay for each year of service of termination calculated using base pay and average shift premium.
His current base pay exceeds $500,000 per year, which means Ladner may get well more than $1 million after being fired.