Barrier

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Barrier

1. See: Trade barrier.

2. See: Barrier Option.
References in periodicals archive ?
Barrier methods were condoms, diaphragms, and withdrawal before ejaculation.
The other 57 (23%) women were either using condoms (12%), other barrier methods (1%), minimally effective contraceptive methods (3%), or no method (1%); were pregnant (3%); or wanted to become pregnant (3%).
At enrollment, participants were randomly assigned to one of two intervention groups (basic or enhanced); completed a baseline interview that covered their background, medical, behavioral and psychosocial characteristics; received a pelvic examination; and were taught to record information about their sexual behavior and barrier method use in a daily diary.
None of the 50 girls who wanted to be pregnant or were unsure about pregnancy used a hormonal method; 50% used a barrier method.
To address her nausea and low libido, Sandy should come off the Pill and use barrier methods for two months, after which time her progress can be reviewed.
A substantial number of American women do not believe they are personally at risk for an STD, and therefore aren't interested in barrier methods.
At their initial study visit, the women underwent STD testing, received an intervention that promoted consistent and correct use of condoms and spermicides, completed a behavioral interview, and learned how to use a diary to record their sexual activity and use of barrier methods.
It covers the complete range of contraceptive methods including a variety of hormonal combinations and delivery systems, IUDs, barrier methods, emergency contraception, sterilisation and traditional methods such as fertility awareness and withdrawal.
Women's health advocates called for the development of female-controlled barrier methods and microbicides beginning in the early 1990s, and following a vigorous campaign, the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of the female condom in 1993.
By 2005, 600% of primary health care and family planning facilities should offer prevention and management of reproductive tract infections, including STDs and barrier methods to prevent infection.
Elias C and Coggins C, Acceptability research on female-controlled barrier methods to prevent heterosexual transmission of HIV: where have we been?
Although spermicides in the USA are mainly used with barrier methods, the increased benefit of such combinations has not been well established.