bar code

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Bar Code

A code placed on a product that a machine can read. Groceries and other products commonly have bar codes on them so a machine can display how much they cost. This ensures accurate prices are paid on retail goods. Bar codes were invented by a graduate student in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1948.

bar code

an alpha or alpha-numeric code, converted into a series of lines and spaces which are marked on products. Bar coding and the use of bar code scanners enables a firm to obtain accurate data quickly on its STOCK position to help with planning its reordering of goods; and can be used to adjust the prices of goods more easily than by replacing price tags. See EPOS.
References in periodicals archive ?
In future, 2-dimensional bar codes and scanners will speed up penetration into all aspects, such as the government, production, distribution, supervision and marketing of enterprises, with the maturity of 2-dimensional bar code technology.
This blog is focused on education with some excellent FAQ sections on the most popular bar codes such as Code 128, Code 39, ISBN, UPC and QR codes.
In some of the Valley's older neighborhoods where there are still door mail slots, the bar codes have been placed inside the mail slot to keep them dry from the rain.
With Ward, they now plan to analyze each fish sample by decoding a certain tiny piece of DNA that can serve as a unique bar code for the species.
offers a bar-coding add-on that prints bar codes and imports inventory transactions recorded remotely by a data collection device.
Patient Safety Innovator and Wristband Identification Leader Collaborate to Best Serve the Needs of Healthcare Organizations in Bar Code Point of Care Technology
today announced the newest addition to its growing family of bar code software products:
Bar codes are as familiar as a trip to buy groceries.
By adopting industry-leading standards and protocols, we've made it extremely easy for customers to include bar codes on documents and forms," said Unibar President Ted Kruse.
Because MEMS-based laser scanners are able to read bar codes up to 40 times as fast as today's legacy equipment, workers are able to capture information more rapidly and efficiently, speeding the flow of information through a supply chain and improving supply chain visibility.