Banker

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Banker

A person, especially an executive, who works for a bank. Bankers provide a wide variety of services, such as monitoring and safeguarding bank accounts, issuing loans, and accounting. Some bankers may also provide investment services such as underwriting or brokering. A banker's client may be an individual, company, or institutional investor, depending on the nature of the transaction and the type of bank.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Certified Mortgage Banker (CMB) designation program was started in 1973 for members of the Mortgage Bankers Association who have demonstrated through education, experience and performance a proficient knowledge of the broad spectrum of real estate finance.
This explains why not all of the central bankers celebrating BIS's seventy-fifth birthday this summer were happy.
While the regulations do not permit mere allocations between deductible and nondeductible amounts, it remains to be seen whether Treasury will accept allocations made by the investment bankers themselves to the various services they provided, based on informed recollections of the course of the engagement, even though such allocations may not be supported by time and expense records.
Oh, right," conceded the bankers, who then shifted to the old ruse that passage of the referendum would cause corporations to flee, jobs to be lost, and the state to dry up and blow away.
Virginia bankers like the SBLI plan because it can increase revenue, broaden insurance offerings to customers, and form stronger relationships with them, said R.
The investment bankers say demand for your IPO looks strong, and they expect your stock to open with a "pop.
On a day when bankers and credit unions were facing off in the U.
Mortgage bankers are regulated by state banking departments, and many states require them to be licensed as well.
As with all aspects of the Dashboard, the budgeting and forecasting capabilities were designed specifically for community bankers - streamlining processes and incorporating just the right level of detail for the bank.
Furthermore, companies that might normally oppose loan syndication are agreeing to the bankers' conditions in the hopes the terms will either not be exercised or will be done in close consultation with their bankers.
Traditionally, investment bankers have written most of them, but the high fees and low risks have attracted new competition-consultants and some CPA firms, for example.