Bank Failure


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Bank Failure

A situation in which a bank is unable to service its debts. This may occur when too many of a bank's loans default or, more rarely, when a bank has too few accounts providing it with cash flow. Bank failure used to cause great turmoil to the financial system, but since the Great Depression, the FDIC has insured bank accounts up to a certain amount to reduce the pressure for bank runs. When a bank fails, the FDIC takes it over and either sells it to another bank or operates the bank itself.
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Those two states account for almost a third of the bank failures since the beginning of 2008.
Both concluded that neural networks could perform as good as or better than other early warning systems for bank failure.
Georgia leads the country in bank failures, with 12 year-to-date and 64 since the cycle started in 2007.
Wilson and Fox confirmed for the first time that a stable streambank can quickly become unstable when seepage erosion is added to the mix of factors that promote bank failure.
When some experts study bank failures, they aren't scrutinizing the books of badly run financial institutions.
We derive state-level bank failure rate measures using branch-level data, which allows us to capture the impact of interstate branching on state-level failure rates.
The largest US bank failure ever also came last year: Seattle-based thrift Washington Mutual Inc.
The European Commission has proposed member states to tax banks in their territories to manage bank failure and prevent future financial crises.
Impact on FDIC Fund This bank failure represents a further dent in the deposit insurance fund (DIF), meant for protecting customer accounts.
That is why I believe that banks should be asked to contribute to a fund designed to manage bank failure, protect financial stability and limit contagion - but which is not a bailout fund.
In order to ensure the fairness in its business conditions, Ashikaga Bank will seek to find an acquirer by April 2005, when Japan will impose a per-depositor refund limit of 10 million yen per bank on ordinary deposits and checking accounts in the event of a bank failure, said Ikeda, who was appointed Ashikaga Bank chief last December.
Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi and Financial Services Minister Hakuo Yanagisawa confirmed Friday the government's plan to impose a cap next April 1 on the protection of all existing deposits in the event of a bank failure except for checking accounts used for settlements.