Ballpark


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Related to Ballpark: Ballpark figure, ballpark estimate

Ballpark

Informal; an estimate. For example, when analysts are in the process of determining a company's earnings, they may release a "ballpark" as they continue their calculations.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As a new baseball season gets under way this month, fans in Nevada and Tennessee will see a couple of new names at their ballparks.
Tech Night at the Ballpark allowed the Birch Team to interact with hundreds of local business owners, influencers, and technology enthusiasts from various industries and verticals.
The result is a mouth-watering education on how ballpark food developed, especially recommended for any who hold affection for either subject.
The naming of the ballpark provides the bank with the value of embedded marketing through the fan experience--region-ally and nationally, notes Susan Johnson, the bank's chief marketing officer.
The Marlins are not the first to tarp off part of a ballpark due to attendance concerns, but are far and away the earliest at doing so.
John Zinn contributes a rather standard and uncritical biographical treatment of Charles Ebbets, the man who built the ballpark and was majority owner of the Dodgers until his death in 1925.
No listed dimensions for Columbia Park were found in any of the usual ballpark reference books.
The equipment was purchased when groundbreaking for the new 42,000 seat ballpark began-four years before the stadium opened," explains Kawachi.
Earlier this year, during the debate over whether Ballpark Village should get more than $100 million of public subsidies, it was again being mentioned how the St.
The agreement would create a 32,000- to 35,000-seat ballpark to be named Cisco Field on a 143-acre parcel held by the company.
Thousands of DAV members and their guests have attended 35 special DAV Day at the Ballpark games this season.
Like Selig, Huizenga pleaded poverty, he blatantly lied about his finances, and when the locals failed to reward his 1997 World Championship with the ballpark of his dreams, he engaged in what baseball economist Andrew Zimbalist has called "the most radical fire sale of players in baseball history," leading to a disastrous 54-108 record.