Baksheesh


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Baksheesh

Arabic for "gratuity," which is used as a euphemism for bribery.
References in periodicals archive ?
Baksheesh is a Turkish term referring to a bribe or kick-back.
Toward the end of each evening when Afghan rockers perform, members of the Baksheesh Boys and local expat musicians who mentor the Afghan musicians join the Afghans on stage for extended improvisational jam sessions.
Otherwise its more Baksheesh for the project owners who never seem to run out of our hard-earned money.
However, given the shadowy economy with its taxi drivers, waiters, nightclubs, prostitutes, and with the famous baksheesh seekers roaming the streets, unofficial figures suggest more like one in 10 Egyptians actually lives off tourism.
Taxi drivers, waiters and even call girls - including a vast number of Russian women who have taken up the profession in Egypt's big cities - as well as the generations-old army of children and old men haunting street corners demanding baksheesh all profit from the tourist industry.
A few thousand dollars worth of baksheesh, or gratuity, is usually all it takes to persuade customs officials at the frontier to look the other away.
Groups of these dispossessed and unwanted block the paths of unwitting tourists, pleading pitifully for baksheesh (tips), rubbing their stomachs and making hand motions towards their mouths.
By directly multiplexing several data channels onto a single wavelength, we eliminate the need for electrical sub-multiplexing using SONET or ATM," said Sorrento Networks' Vice President of Marketing, Baksheesh Ghuman.
They asked a lot of questions, which stopped only when they received their baksheesh (bribe).
46) Corruption in the form of bribery is such an organic feature of Russian life through centuries that it has acquired several definitions in Russian: vzyatka, mzdoimstvo, likhoimstvo and even baksheesh, which is an Eastern term.
Other religious immigrants came from the Middle East and Asia, where baksheesh was part of daily life and where distinctions between the private and public spheres were amorphous.