Backup Tape


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Backup Tape

A hard drive with memory space available to save extra copies of computer data. That is, a backup tape is where one stores data in case the original data is lost. Having backup tape is especially important if one keeps a great deal of information for one's company on a computer. Businesses commonly use backup tape to keep their computer information in more than one place.
References in periodicals archive ?
This solution provides an efficient way to add historical data to their active archives as well and addresses the huge liability risk corporations face when dealing with large collections of backup tapes which were originally intended for disaster recovery purposes.
Backup tapes are typically rated to be used from 5,000 to a half million times, depending on the type of tape.
The only source of recovery from multiple-drive failures or complete hardware failure is a backup tape.
Tape Restoration Trusted Data Solutions can restore, catalog and process every backup tape format, optical disk format, and logical format that has been in commercial use over the past three decades.
While backup tapes were originally intended for near term recovery from full system failures, today they are often retained for long periods of time and have become de facto archives, albeit archives with duplicative and often outdated or obsolete data.
With this direct approach, the firm is providing corporate clients a more controlled and secure environment to access evidence contained on backup tapes.
RenewData's Backup Tape Liability Management Service uses a secure process to quickly evaluate the content of backup tapes and reduce the ongoing storage costs associated with unnecessarily retaining tapes not required for a corporation's legal, regulatory, or retention management purposes.
Nor are the discovery issues that have presented themselves novel; the discovery under dispute is routine discovery of e-mail on active servers, archives, and backup tapes, an issue likely to be familiar to most records and information managers, many of whom have had to undertake similar discovery at their own organizations.
Many corporations have accumulated a large number of backup tapes because of overlapping litigation holds and business acquisitions.
Other costs are attributable to the inadvertent over-replication of data--for every megabyte file that is created, there exists 10-15 megabytes of that file residing on multiple full backup tape sets, HSM tapes, archive tapes, and replication disks.
Index Engines, the leader in enterprise discovery solutions, today announced that Constantine & Aborn Advisory Services, LLC (CAAS), a premier litigation consulting company, has selected Index Engines as its technology provider of choice for the electronic discovery of backup tape data.
Iron Mountain is not aware of any incident in which the physical loss of a backup tape resulted in the unauthorized access of personal information.