Baby Bell

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Baby Bell

Any of seven telecommunications companies that were formed from AT&T after its antitrust break-up in 1984. In that year, AT&T was determined to be so large that it violated antitrust law in the United States and it was forced to spin off seven subsidiaries, which became known as the baby bells. Few of the baby bells still exist as independent companies, as most have gone through a series of mergers and acquisitions in the years since.

Baby Bell

One of several integrated-communications providers that were formerly part of AT&T but became independent in 1984 following AT&T's court-ordered divestiture. The seven original Baby Bells were once operating subsidiaries of AT&T that provided local and intrastate long-distance service.
References in periodicals archive ?
The takeover will also enable the new AT&T, which was itself taken over by former Baby Bell SBC Communications last November, to extend its reach in the south-east of the US.
Rather than compete, cable companies and Baby Bells can, and probably will, join forces and block out smaller competitors.
Much like Ma Bell and her Baby Bells, most paging companies offer services on a monthly basis.
We and other former Baby Bells are still obligated to unbundle lines and switches, which competitors can in turn connect to the switches they own and have deployed.
Three Baby Bells - Bell Atlantic, Nynex and Pacific Telesis - announced they had formed a consortium dubbed Tele-TV, which would take cable programming and send it by line-of-sight microwave transmissions directly to customers' homes.
The new company, AirTouch Communications, aims to skirt federal restrictions on the seven Baby Bells set in the 1982 breakup of AT&T, integrating long-distance service into wireless operations.
Baby Bells, SBC, Verizon, BellSouth, Qwest and Sprint have already rolled out quadruple play offers which are marketed either under their own brand or in partnership with satellite or mobile operators.
The effort by the Baby Bells to form a telecommunications cartel of network owners and equipment suppliers is an outrageous move.
Through acquisitions, AT&T is building the nation's largest cable system so it doesn't have to go through the Baby Bells to deliver voice and data.
Cable industry re-regulation--including the entrance of the Baby Bells into the business--threatens to roil the distribution mix, and channel capacity issues cloud the prospects for expansion.
Like BE has pointed out in the past, blacks fared quite well at the spun-off Baby Bells.
The federal Telecommunications Act of 1996 requires SBC and other Baby Bells to show that their telephone systems can efficiently and effectively switch existing customers to competing local service providers before the company is permitted to offer long-distance service.