Baby Bell


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

Baby Bell

Any of seven telecommunications companies that were formed from AT&T after its antitrust break-up in 1984. In that year, AT&T was determined to be so large that it violated antitrust law in the United States and it was forced to spin off seven subsidiaries, which became known as the baby bells. Few of the baby bells still exist as independent companies, as most have gone through a series of mergers and acquisitions in the years since.

Baby Bell

One of several integrated-communications providers that were formerly part of AT&T but became independent in 1984 following AT&T's court-ordered divestiture. The seven original Baby Bells were once operating subsidiaries of AT&T that provided local and intrastate long-distance service.
References in periodicals archive ?
It will also see BellSouth return to its roots, as it and a number of other operators ( dubbed the Baby Bells ( were spun off from AT&T in the 1980s.
There's a reason why The Washington Post calls the Baby Bell lobbyists "The Kings of Capitol Hill.
In the litany of mergers, seven of the original Baby Bells have agreed to become four, and now the four biggest long-distance companies have decided to become two.
Three Baby Bells - Bell Atlantic, Nynex and Pacific Telesis - announced they had formed a consortium dubbed Tele-TV, which would take cable programming and send it by line-of-sight microwave transmissions directly to customers' homes.
The report calls on state utility commissions to resist efforts by the Baby Bells to squeeze competitors out of the market by raising wholesale prices.
The Baby Bell has more than 1,000 employee development programs, which range from career development workshops to counseling and educational programs.
Critics of the cable industry like to point to satellite and Baby Bell competition as risks.
Integra Telecom is a fast-growing, integrated communications carrier committed to providing a local, high-quality service alternative to the incumbent, monopoly Baby Bell telecom providers.
Last year, the company, based in San Antonio, acquired the Pacific Telesis Group, a Baby Bell based in San Francisco and the dominant phone company in California and Nevada, in a $16.
Berkeley study by professor Yale Braunstein found that the Baby Bell proposal could increase Internet rates by 20 to 30 percent and that more than half the ISPs that serve rural areas will drop service to some remote areas.
It also would face strident protests from Baby Bell companies that now are prevented by federal rules from entering the long-distance business.
Friday's gain came on a report in Business Week magazine that a regional Baby Bell may buy a 5 percent to 10 percent stake in the company.