Baath Party

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Baath Party

A political party in the Middle East advocating secular, socialist policies intended to free Arab-majority countries from Western influence. It was established in 1940 in Syria. Its Syrian and Iraqi branches split in 1955 and became antagonistic toward each other. It became the ruling party of Syria in 1963 and was in charge of Iraq from 1968 until 2003.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's the Baathist regime's secular character that makes it so important.
And even when Baghdad is able to recapture territory, the militants and their Baathist allies undermine the central government's efforts to restore order.
Sectarian divisions existed in Syria long before the Baathists came to power.
For many, those fears have been swept to one side; fears of what might happen, overcome by fears of what actually is happening at the hands of the Baathist regime.
With current events perhaps suggesting an answer to the question of confrontation or co-optation posed in the subtitle, this volume collects three essays, each based on contemporary fieldwork, examining relations between the Baathist state and Islam in Syria.
The Baathist official challenged Aseer to run for election on a Sida ballot-ticket in order to demonstrate the extent of his popularity in the Sida Street.
Threatens Baathists with Prosecution if they Fail to Renounce the Party in Writing
Government officials have long expressed concern that Baathists would try to retake power when U.
In the sprawling Shi ite slum of Sadr City in northern Baghdad, a panel s move to ban scores of candidates for alleged Baathist links is the talk of the town in teahouses where men smoke Arabic water pipes and argue over sugary glasses of tea.
In his first news conference since the Baathist ballot purge, Ahmad Chalabi said that the Accountability and Justice Committee that he heads "managed to reach results supporting [the] constitution.
George W Bush had branded Dr AssadAEs regime as a cheerleader of terrorism, a haven for Iraqi Baathist and jihadist insurgents, the assassin of LebanonAEs Druze, Maronite and Sunni political elite, IranAEs proxy in the heart of the Arab world, weapons supplier to Hezbollah, Hamas and Islamic Jihad.
But Mohammed Jarboua, who claimed to be chairman of the new venture, was quoted as saying that there was no Baathist link, and that the channel was for Iraqis and other Arabs who supported the late dictator.