Baath Party

(redirected from Baathist)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Baath Party

A political party in the Middle East advocating secular, socialist policies intended to free Arab-majority countries from Western influence. It was established in 1940 in Syria. Its Syrian and Iraqi branches split in 1955 and became antagonistic toward each other. It became the ruling party of Syria in 1963 and was in charge of Iraq from 1968 until 2003.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Baathists were Arab nationalists and, by inclination, secular.
The military and economic aid to the Baathist regime from Russia and Iran cannot be described as otherwise.
Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki surprised both Baathists and his political partners by calling for a constitutional freeze and the prohibition of the Baath Party under the Iraqi constitution, the pan-Arab daily ASHARQ AL AWSAT said on Thursday.
Many feel the candidate ban and vows by Shi ite parties including Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki s Dawa to purge the civil service of Baathists is sweet revenge for Saddam s brutal rule and oppression of the Shi ite majority and minority Kurds.
One of the most prominent banned candidates is Sunni Parliament lawmaker Saleh al-Mutlaq, who has acknowledged he was a Baathist until the late 1970s, when he quit the party.
With an embryonic consumer culture, symbolised by Dior advertisements, Internet cafes and glitzy shopping malls in the heart of Damascus and Aleppo, coupled with rising inflation, one of the youngest, fastest growing populations on earth and 25 per cent unemployment rates, Baathist Syria is an economic time bomb.
The Iraqi government said it suspected that Baathists, whose political party Saddam once led, were behind the broadcasts.
In a decision since regretted, American authorities dissolved the Baathist Party after the 2003 Iraq invasion and excluded most of its members from government jobs.
Nor is it surprising that, rather than configuring his military for foreign aggression, its "main mission was to ensure the internal security of the Baathist dictatorship," and was concerned "with everything except fighting wars.
BEIRUT - The allegation that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, who inherited the Baathist throne from his dead father in mid-2000, or someone close ordered the assassination of former Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri of Lebanon will only confirm what most Lebanese have been suspecting since the blast killed the billionaire statesman and 20 others in Beirut on Feb.
Weeks of discussions with Sunni Arab representatives who had been shut out of the drafting process went predictably nowhere when the Sunnis declined to sign on to divisive designs for federalism and vindictive rules for former Baathist supporters.