Baath Party

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Baath Party

A political party in the Middle East advocating secular, socialist policies intended to free Arab-majority countries from Western influence. It was established in 1940 in Syria. Its Syrian and Iraqi branches split in 1955 and became antagonistic toward each other. It became the ruling party of Syria in 1963 and was in charge of Iraq from 1968 until 2003.
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides the documents and tapes from various branches of the Ba'thist regime, he consults the British Foreign Office documents, books penned by Saddam Hussein, and Arabic newspapers.
Therefore, Saddam Hussein's dictatorial Ba'thist regime was far from representing the model to be imitated because, in the eyes of the Maghrebis and other Arabs, this type of regime had serious limitations.
The technocrats have freedom in the way decisions are executed but, in return, are responsible for their actions; they will be punished if their actions endanger the security of the Ba'thist regime.
The technocrats have freedom in the way decisions are executed, but are responsible for their actions; they will be punished if their actions endanger the security of the Ba'thist regime.
The Ba'thist regime of Syria, then headed by President Hafez al-Assad, had responded favourably to a geo-political overture from the Ba'thist dictator Saddam Hussein, who had wanted to end an old dispute with Damascus and boost two-way trade on a full scale in open defiance of a comprehensive UN embargo against Baghdad.
In Beirut, however, politicians and energy experts doubt that the Ba'thist regime of Syria will make things smooth for Lebanon to receive Egyptian gas through its territory.
But Bashar kept the secular element of Syria's Ba'thist regime unchanged; and, in a recent interview with a US talk-show host, when asked what the first challenge to his regime was, the young Assad replied "the radical Islamists, who are terrorists".
It is said that the 'Alawites, who control the Ba'thist regime, make up about 10% of the Syrian population.
The majority Sunni population could be even less amenable to US interests than the ruling 'Alawite minority, and Islamist gains in elections in Palestine, Iraq and Egypt hint at similar rumblings beneath the opaque shell of Syria's Ba'thist regime.
The Ba'thist regime made Kirkuk part of an Arab province called Tamim.
But the latter terminal relates to a crude oil pipeline from Iraq built by Saddam's Ba'thist regime and seized by the Saudi state in 2001.
The Ba'thist regime, still under political pressure over a UN investigation which implicated it in the murder of Rafiq Hariri, the former Lebanese prime minister, has recently tried to put a positive spin on its ability to withstand economic measures.