Baath Party

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Baath Party

A political party in the Middle East advocating secular, socialist policies intended to free Arab-majority countries from Western influence. It was established in 1940 in Syria. Its Syrian and Iraqi branches split in 1955 and became antagonistic toward each other. It became the ruling party of Syria in 1963 and was in charge of Iraq from 1968 until 2003.
References in periodicals archive ?
Allied to this layer then were the two VPs, Abdul-Halim Khaddam who deputised for the head of state and Zuhair Masharqa who deputised for the head of the Ba'th Party.
Hafez al-Assad took over power from a civilian faction of the Ba'th Party which was more radical than the military.
Even many Kurds and members of other non-Arab communities and Christians used to be members of the Ba'th party, because it was secular.
Sunni Saddam Hussein had destroyed the ruling Ba'th Party as a secularist/ideological element by turning it into a clannish mafia.
Others who died in the attack included Ba'th Party security chief Gen.
The country's largest secular bloc, a cross-sectarian coalition grouping most of the Sunni and Shi'ite nationalists most of whom were once members of the now-banned Ba'th Party, al-Iraqiya on Feb.
He was referring to several key pieces of legislation as well as a reform of the law to partially reverse a purge of the former ruling Ba'th Party from public life and several changes to the constitution.
Hafez al-Assad took over power from a more radical faction of the Ba'th Party.
Maruf will be the first senior Iraqi official to visit Syria since the two countries, ruled by rival factions of the Ba'th Party, broke ties in 1980.
Political organizations like the Communist Party, the Syrian Social Nationalist Party, and the Ba'th Party were involved, while the student unions at the Lebanese University and the American University of Beirut led the student movement.
A member of the Ba'th Party, which he joined in order to advance in his career, Safar was promoted through the ranks of the ruling organisation in the years since the late 1980s.
A secular Shi'ite Arab and a former member of the now-banned Ba'th Party, Dr Allawi agrees with Saudi Arabia, head of the GCC and of the Sunni front in the Muslim world, that the gap between the Arab region and Iran is ethnic rather than sectarian and that the conflict is Arab-Persian, rather than Sunni-Shi'ite.