Baath Party

(redirected from Ba'th)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to Ba'th: Ba'ath, Baathist, Ba'ath regime

Baath Party

A political party in the Middle East advocating secular, socialist policies intended to free Arab-majority countries from Western influence. It was established in 1940 in Syria. Its Syrian and Iraqi branches split in 1955 and became antagonistic toward each other. It became the ruling party of Syria in 1963 and was in charge of Iraq from 1968 until 2003.
References in periodicals archive ?
Already since 1970, the Ba'th Party had been reduced to a rubber-stamp - just as Saddam Hussein had done to Iraq's Ba'th Party.
Moreover, he interviews some Iraqi officials and generals who were members of the Ba'th Party.
Maleki blames the attacks on the Alawite/Ba'thist regime of Syria and Saddam's Damascus-based Ba'th faction, as well as on the Sunni/Neo-Salafi insurgent groups like al-Qaeda.
Though she says he had not intended to leave for good, he found the Ba'th Party and the political situation inside Iraq too unsettling to return a decade later.
Sakai's chapter identifies the major targets of the revolution that began on 1 March 1991: Ba'th Party buildings, security and police offices and prisons.
Khamis Sirhan al-Muhammad: Ba'th Party Regional Chairman for Karbala Governorate.
An editorial in the ruling Ba'th Party's Ath-Thawra newspaper charged Kuwait is stealing Iraqi oil by extracting from oil fields that under international law should be extracted from jointly.
Ruled by rival wings of the Ba'th Party, Iraq and Syria broke diplomatic and economic ties in 1980 when Iraq accused Syria of engineering an abortive coup against Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, a charge that Damascus has repeatedly denied.
RISING to power through Ba'th party, the Iraqi dictator relies on purges, torture and death to fuel his rule of fear.
The younger generation of Arab nationalists, such as the founders of the Ba'th Party in Syria, Michel 'Aflaq and Salah al-Din Bitar, or the Free Officers in Egypt led by Gamal 'Abd al-Nasser, had grown up experiencing French and British colonialism mandated after World War I.
He said Erbil ("temporary" capital of Kurdistan pending annexation of oil-rich Kirkuk to be its "permanent capital"), had become the "operations centre for ISIS, the Ba'th [party] and al-Qaeda".
Tikrit was one of the two main cities held by the allied militants of ISIL and members of the former Ba'th party headed by executed dictator Saddam Hussein.