Baath Party

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Baath Party

A political party in the Middle East advocating secular, socialist policies intended to free Arab-majority countries from Western influence. It was established in 1940 in Syria. Its Syrian and Iraqi branches split in 1955 and became antagonistic toward each other. It became the ruling party of Syria in 1963 and was in charge of Iraq from 1968 until 2003.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to a 1993 Human Rights Watch report, 100,000 people were killed at the hands of the Ba'ath regime, with the Anfal campaign of genocide against the Kurds formally recognised by the House of Commons in February this year.
However, the article has not been applied fully in order to reverse the inhumane policies of the Ba'ath regime.
The project is aimed at helping to break down what Feras describes as the "glamorisation of violence and fetishisation of guns" which occurred under the Ba'ath regime.
The atrociousness of the Ba'ath regime, and its internal and external record of violence, are completely irrelevant to this judgement.
Each ethnic group fears the other - the Shia majority broadly favour a religious state, the Kurds - brutally oppressed by Saddam - want autonomy and the Sunnis who profited under Saddam want to dissociate themselves from the Ba'ath regime.
Instead of warning or discouraging nuclear threshold states, such as Iran and North Korea, from developing nuclear arsenals, the lesson that these countries are most likely to learn from the Iraq example is that they must accelerate their nuclear weapons programs in order to avoid the fate of the Ba'ath regime.
The fact that we have not been able to show his fate lets the remnants of the Ba'ath regime go round saying Saddam will come back, so don't cooperate with the coalition.
The raids are a further dent to a Ba'ath regime already rocked by the British capture of a senior party official during an earlier sortie.
As the traditional base of support for the Ba'ath regime, tourism has been a tool through which the regime has attempted to develop rural Syria, and thus maintain its popular support.
On June 19, 2013, Russian President Vladimir Putin said chemical laboratories in Iraq are producing chemical weapons for the terrorists in Syria, confirming a detailed report by the FNA in May which said former Ba'ath regime officials are involved in the production and procurement of such weapons to the Syrian terrorists.
They have accused the regime of systematically killing protesters in a bid to crush the uprising against the 48-year rule of the Al Ba'ath regime.
Israel's security apparatuses have accused Syria of seeking to stir a tense front in order to divert attention from the popular uprisings that have been trying to overthrow the Ba'ath regime.