Baath Party

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Baath Party

A political party in the Middle East advocating secular, socialist policies intended to free Arab-majority countries from Western influence. It was established in 1940 in Syria. Its Syrian and Iraqi branches split in 1955 and became antagonistic toward each other. It became the ruling party of Syria in 1963 and was in charge of Iraq from 1968 until 2003.
References in periodicals archive ?
Opposition sources told Sudan Tribune that the National Intelligence and Security Services (NISS) have arrested Wajdi Saleh, a lawyer and leading member of the Ba'th Party from his office in Khartoum and Najla Mohamed Ali, a leading member of the Civil Society Initiative (CSI) group.
After the early 1991 Gulf War in which US-led multi-national forces liberated Kuwait from Saddam's dictatorship, the Shi'ite Arabs in southern Iraq went into open rebellion against Saddam and his ruling Ba'th Party.
The Iraqi archives, based at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, contain millions of documents relating to the thirty-five year period [1968-2003] when Iraq was ruled by the Ba'th Party.
Qassem was ousted by a February 1963 coup of Abdul-Salam Aref's Nasserites and the Ba'th Party.
Among their topics are the British Mandate 1920-32, the end of the monarchy 1946-58, the era of Ba'th Party rule 1968-79, Saddam Hussain's regime 1990-2003, the US attempt at nation-building in Iraq 2003-06, and Iraq and the challenge of the Islamic State 2014-16.
thesis at Boston University, is largely based on Ba'th Party documents covering the period 1979-2003.
Both are controlled by the president of the republic, who heads the Ba'th party, the armed forces and various security and intelligence services.
ISIS includes Bedouin tribes in Sunni Arab areas, the Sahwa fighters who had been created by the US forces, remnants of Saddam's mostly atheist Army and Ba'th Party headed by his deputy Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri and his armed Naqshabandi Sufis.
And in June 2014 he led a coalition of groups other than ISIS including the Ba'th Party, the Sufi movement of al-Naqshabandia (both lead by Izat Ibrahim al-Douri) and forces from large Sunni Arab tribes.
The ISIL's top commander in Tikrit - the birthplace of Iraq's executed dictator Saddam Hussein which was held by the ISIL and members of the former Ba'th party for two weeks - was killed in the Iraqi army operation.
Yet, AQM attacks in Iraq are eclipsed by those of al-Naqshbandia, a Sunni movement which has a Sufi order and is fed mainly by Sunni Arabs of the banned Ba'th Party.
The Pentagon and the State Department reported to George Bush, who was about as famous for his wisdom and sagacity about what was happening in Iraq under the Ba'th Party as Sheikh Abu Hammad.