Autocracy


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Autocracy

A government system in which one person has complete and total power. While autocracy does not exist in practice, dictatorships often concentrate power in only a few persons.
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Of course, countries that have perpetually existed within autocracy may never have fully developed the human and social capital necessary to support economic development if, or when, the country transitions to more democratic institutions.
McFaul dismisses Hong Kong and Singapore as exceptions to the rule that liberalism does not evolve from autocracy, alluding to the fact that those policies were the legatees of a British colonial tradition that bequeathed to them a legacy of the rule of law, civil liberties, and honest administration.
Moreover, China and (to a much lesser extent) Russia provide a model for successful autocracy, a way to create wealth and stability without political liberalization.
For example, the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, founded in 2001, seeks to create an alliance between authoritarian and energy-deficient China and its former Communist ally and parallel autocracy, oil-exporter Russia.
Eventually, a settlement was brokered but the result was a new autocracy, not democracy.
The peaceful rally aimed at showing people's hatred for autocracy would go on,'' said Krishna Sitaula, spokesperson of the Nepali Congress Party, told Kyodo News.
After an introduction by the editor there are contributions on the nature of the autocracy under Nicholas II, the development of constitutionalism, the role of the secret police, an interesting essay in the role of theatrical impresarios in late Imperial Russia, the importance of the economist, M.
If not, the end result could be an autocracy and tyranny.
Mistrust between whole populations may turn out to be more serious than the autocracy of Soviet bloc rulers.
It misses the central point: that, unlike traditional Third World liberation movements looking for a bit of peace and quiet in which to nurture embryonic states, Al Qaeda is classically imperialist, looking to subvert established social orders and to replace the cultural and institutional infrastructure of its enemies with a (divinely inspired) hierarchical autocracy of its own, looking to craft the next chapter of human history in its own image.