Authoritarian Society

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Authoritarian Society

A society characterized by political and/or economic submission to an authority, whether it is a person, party, or class. In an authoritarian society, the individuals exist to serve the state or ruling clique. The power having authority may rule arbitrarily; that is, it is not bound by its own laws. This concept is opposed to democracy, individualism, and the rule of law. Democratic societies are thought to possess more impetus for long term economic growth, although authoritarian counterexamples exist.
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Very few people want to move to authoritarian societies, while millions want to move to democracies.
In liberal societies, individuals or groups that advocate the replacement of democracy with a more authoritarian regime are labeled extremists; in authoritarian societies, those who espouse liberal ideals are labeled as extremists by the ruling class or government.
The research, authored by Andrea Kendall-Taylor and Erica Frantz, not only presents insightful data on the prospects for democracy in post-autocratic societies, but also offers democracy assistance implementers new ways of thinking about how to best support reform-minded activists living in authoritarian societies.
Over and over, whether it is in Brazil or Qatar preparing for the soccer World Cup, or the Olympic Games held in oppressive and authoritarian societies, the same contradiction becomes apparent.
Over and over, whether it is in Brazil or Qatar preparing for the World Cup or the Olympic Games held in oppressive and authoritarian societies, the same contradiction becomes apparent.
Muslim women in strict authoritarian societies do not usually have the option of seeking the law's protection.
Morozov criticizes the belief that free access to information, combined with new tools of mobilization afforded by blogs and social networks, will lead to the opening of authoritarian societies and their eventual democratization.
America was born from a desire to establish a new utopia far from the authoritarian societies of Europe.
Managerial classes have operated in straightforwardly authoritarian societies, but they flourish best when dealing with a formless mass of individuals, held together by the expectation of material security and by appeals to egalitarian ideals.
In authoritarian societies, this happy state of affairs does not, for obvious reasons, pertain.
Political humor of a different sort emerges in authoritarian societies.
It is the kind of consensus that operates in authoritarian societies -- the president takes the decisions and the political parties rubber-stamp them in a show of unity.