Australian Dollar

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Australian Dollar

The currency of Australia. It was introduced in 1966, replacing the Australian pound. It was initially pegged to the British pound, but later pegged to the U.S. dollar in 1967. It is now a floating currency and is one of the most widely traded currencies in the world. It is especially important in the South Pacific region, where a number of small nations either use the Australian Dollar or peg their currencies to it at a 1:1 ratio.
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The decline in the Australian currency has provided an opportunity to increase margins in our European and North American markets.
The Company's reported revenue contribution from Network TEN has been significantly affected by a decline in the relative value of the Australian currency.
This will hopefully provide a complete set of Australian currency with some 2 and 1 cent coins, may bring in some older $1 and $2 notes, some pre-plastic currency ($1, $2 up to $20 notes) or commemorative $10 notes, and hopefully some pre-decimal coins (pennies, halfpennies, threepence, sixpence, florins, shillings).
The Australian currency has been one of the biggest casualties in a rally for the US currency since July and Reserve Bank of Australia Deputy Governor Philip Lowe this week propelled it to as low as $0.
Businesses consider the running of a manufacturing plant in ANZ tough due to the high cost of labour, the strong Australian currency, and rising material prices.
Australian bank or bank draft made payable in Australian currency, for
The result assisted by favourable conversion of New Zealand dollar earnings to Australian currency, reflecting the relative strength of the kiwi dollar against its trans-Tasman counterpart.
The RBA interest rate decision was also absent from a dovish post rate statement suggesting that the Australian currency was overvalued, which might be expressed during an upcoming RBA minutes release.
Strong investment and subsequent ore production and exports led to increased international demand for the Australian currency, which in turn drove up its international value.
Instead, they will be able to use Australian currency without a conversion, which should lower costs.
The Australian currency has also been climbing, which is hurting industries including manufacturing and tourism.
The Australian currency is said to be sensitive to the Chinese economy due to the close trading ties between Australia and the world's second-largest economy, market analysts said.

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