Australian Dollar

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Australian Dollar

The currency of Australia. It was introduced in 1966, replacing the Australian pound. It was initially pegged to the British pound, but later pegged to the U.S. dollar in 1967. It is now a floating currency and is one of the most widely traded currencies in the world. It is especially important in the South Pacific region, where a number of small nations either use the Australian Dollar or peg their currencies to it at a 1:1 ratio.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the Aussie dollar has strengthened by about 20 per cent since 2009, and half Gorgon's costs are in the currency, oil prices are up about 80 per cent in that time.
4 Aussie dollars during 2008, that has fallen by more than a third to 1.
Aussie Dollar finished fourth and progressed further when last seen at Kempton just 13 days ago.
BOB MENZIES WAS PM, the Aussie dollar didn't exist, and the world had not heard of Chernobyl when contractors from the Australian Atomic Energy Commission began clearing bushland south of Sydney as the site for a new nuclear research reactor in the early 1950s.
The dramatic ECB and Bank of Japan QE ensure that dollar strength will continue in 2015, meaning that commodities currencies like the Aussie dollar, Canadian dollar, Malaysian ringgit and South African rand will continue to depreciate.
Figures from the central bank showed that it was looking to trim down a rebounding Aussie dollar, as it was among the biggest threats to an economic recovery as a mining slowdown deepens.
On top of this, the fall in the Aussie dollar means that petrol prices are under upward pressure , explains Diana.
While the decision to keep interest rates unchanged had been widely expected, the Aussie dollar dropped in reaction to the Reserve Bank of Australia's statement that the local currency was still high, despite its recent slide.
It said the Aussie dollar remained high despite a recent steep decline and saw scope for it to fall further, possibly diminishing the chances of another rate cut.
It is no coincidence that the Aussie dollar has fallen from its stratospheric heights last summer even though iron ore exports to China/China GDP growth actually rose this winter.
With the lingering issues in Europe and tentative economic growth in the US, the Aussie dollar may continue to be supported at its current level or slightly higher range.
Certainly, you can bet your Aussie dollar that the Wallabies will turn up here with a few youngsters many of us have hardly heard of.