Audience

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Audience

1. The persons who watch, listen to, or read a medium such as a television show or a magazine, or who are likely to do so.

2. The persons who are the targets of an advertising campaign, or the persons who have actually been exposed to it.
References in classic literature ?
It was only a few years before that time that any white man in the audience might have claimed me as his slave; and it was easily possible that some of my former owners might be present to hear me speak.
Show the management that such turns are unpopular, and in a day, in an instant, the management will cease catering such turns to its audiences.
For all that the audience noticed, he did not exist.
There was Miss Belvawney--who seldom aspired to speaking parts, and usually went on as a page in white silk hose, to stand with one leg bent, and contemplate the audience, or to go in and out after Mr Crummles in stately tragedy--twisting up the ringlets of the beautiful Miss Bravassa, who had once had her likeness taken 'in character' by an engraver's apprentice, whereof impressions were hung up for sale in the pastry-cook's window, and the greengrocer's, and at the circulating library, and the box-office, whenever the announce bills came out for her annual night.
The plays were given sometimes in the halls of nobles and gentlemen, either when banquets were in progress or on other festival occasions; sometimes before less select audiences in the town halls or on village greens.
Well, the lion-tamer's big play to the audience was putting his head in a lion's mouth.
When the audience recognized these familiar mementos of Pudd'nhead's old time childish "puttering" and folly, the tense and funereal interest vanished out of their faces, and the house burst into volleys of relieving and refreshing laughter, and Tom chirked up and joined in the fun himself; but Wilson was apparently not disturbed.
The faces of the audience began to betray annoyance.
At another, she was to stop, toss her head, and look pertly at the audience -- she did it.
The five had had, it is true, no audience to lengthen their proceedings, for when he and Doctor Manette emerged from the gate, there was a great crowd about it, in which there seemed to be every face he had seen in Court--except two, for which he looked in vain.
Thus came the people of the greenwood before Queen Eleanor, in her own private audience room.
On the night following the prisoner's visit to the audience chamber the conversation finally fell upon this subject, and I was all ears on the instant.