Attribution Theory


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Attribution Theory

The concept stating that people make decisions based on the factors they believe caused their present situations and seek to emulate or avoid those real or perceived causes. For example, if one believes investing in cotton caused one's bankruptcy, one may be unlikely to invest in cotton again, whether or not the supposition is true.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this research, we applied attribution theory to the study of whistle-blowing to further understanding of this topic.
Another important contribution to developing an understanding of responses to verbal abuse is offered by Attribution theory (Heider 1958), which is increasingly utilised to explain behaviour in the workplace (Ashkanasy & Gallois 1994, Douglas & Martinko 2001).
Finally, attribution theory examines the impact that variables such as effort, ability, task, strategy, and luck, have on success or failure (Weiner, 2000).
It could be called a "mixed" model comprising the expectation-disconfirmation paradigm, attribution theory, and the "involvement" construct.
Attribution theory states that rewards based upon accomplishment affect perceived competence and lead people to attribute their behavior to internal causes.
Related theoretical constructs, including social support, self-efficacy, and attribution theory, can be incorporated for application to social work practice.
In this research, the better understood stream of research called attribution theory (specifically attributional explanatory style) was used to understand the effects of failure on future decisions of the entrepreneur.
USING ATTRIBUTION THEORY TO UNDERSTAND AMERICAN INDIAN WOMEN
It considers how these statements might affect numerous education variables from the perspective of attribution theory (Weiner et al.
Students discuss attribution theory, which shows the influence of biases as well as rational factors, on decisions leaders make.
Closest to rationality is attribution theory where the decision-maker is seen as a naive scientist who commits errors because he does not know better.
In addition to explaining stigma, Attribution Theory (Heider, 1958) can also be used to frame bullying experiences for individuals.