Attribution Theory


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Attribution Theory

The concept stating that people make decisions based on the factors they believe caused their present situations and seek to emulate or avoid those real or perceived causes. For example, if one believes investing in cotton caused one's bankruptcy, one may be unlikely to invest in cotton again, whether or not the supposition is true.
References in periodicals archive ?
2013a) discussed in detail about the reasons of why attribution theory is best suited to explain this mechanism of CSR through which employees' attitudes and behaviors can be impacted.
Attribution theory dictates that individual's actions are a result of their beliefs and/or perceptions of causality (Weiner, 1972).
However, previous applications of attribution theory in sport spectatorship have used similar methods (Warm & Dolan, 1994; Warm & Schrader, 2000).
The impact of poor performers on team outcomes: An empirical examination of attribution theory.
Hence, attribution theory tries to explain behavior via causal factors.
Timothy Coombs in 1995 and then developed by him and other researchers, too--as a theory which generates concrete crisis communication tools has its roots in the attribution theory from the field of psychology, originally shaped by Fritz Heider in 1958 and then developed especially by Bernard Weiner.
Two different approaches that we can explore include cognitive mapping and attribution theory.
There is a well-developed and understood theoretical and empirical literature in social psychology called attribution theory to help understand the causal interpretation of events.
Among the topics are the evaluative space model, an attribution theory of motivation, and a model of behavioral self-regulation.
Attribution theory (Weiner, 1980, 1992 cited by Lin and Bill 2003) is considered one of the most influential contemporary theories with implications for academic motivation.
Within the psychology of communication literature which examines the psychological processes whereby actors engage in communicative behavior, Kelley's (1967) Attribution Theory (which built on Heider's 1958 version) proposed that receivers (audiences) make causal inferences about why sources act the way they do and attribute a person's behavior to cither internal dispositional (personal) or external environmental (situational) characteristics.
Causal attribution is another cognitive aspect of forgiveness that is based on attribution theory, where a person attributes another's actions, such as a transgression, to personal factors or contextual factors.