Attorney's Fee

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Attorney's Fee

A fee a lawyer charges for legal services. Lawyers may work by the hour, for a flat fee, or may even be paid a percentage of the amount one wins in a lawsuit.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tronic's implications on government attorney's fees under
To understand the impact of attorney's fees on civil liability, it is first necessary to understand the ways in which an attorney receives compensation for representing a plaintiff and whether the plaintiff is reimbursed for those fees.
With its Octane decision, district court judges have gotten more discretion on attorney's fees in patent cases, Telscher said.
Nevertheless, the plaintiff relied on the case because it discussed proper application of the lodestar method for calculating reasonable and necessary attorneys' fees and stated that "the award of attorney's fees generally rests in the sound discretion of the trial court.
McKesson sought to recoup attorney's fees spent during the decades-long pursuit.
Because the plaintiff admitted the case was moot, he therefore had no claim for attorney's fees.
the Supreme Court held that a claimant need not be a "prevailing party" to be eligible for attorney's fees.
The court held, inter alia, that there was no provision expressly prohibiting the inclusion of attorney's fees and costs as well as reimbursement for other expenses incurred in the course of the plaintiff's suit.
Section 508, governing attorney's fees and clients' rights and responsibilities respecting fees and costs, has been modified to clarify that interim attorney's fees may be awarded from one party to the other not only in pre-judgment dissolution proceedings, but also "in any other proceeding under this subsection," meaning, Gray notes, post-judgment proceedings, appeals, and actions under the Parentage Act of 1984.
A motion seeking attorney's fees as a sanction shall include a certificate of service, pursuant to rule 9.
Without the money provided by attorney's fees, defending the rights of all Americans would be put in serious jeopardy.
Existing law allows any employee to file a civil action to recover unpaid wages or overtime including interest, reasonable attorney's fees and costs of suit and under the Code of Civil Procedure 382 allows for class-action suits.

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