Attitude


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Attitude

A subjective measure of how one or more persons feel about an event, person, or object. Marketers attempt to measure attitudes of consumers to determine the products they may buy. Likewise, analysts measure investor attitudes to estimate future market movements. See also: Sentiment indicator, Behavioral economics.
References in classic literature ?
It is only the men of her kind who war upon us, and I have ever thought that their attitude toward us is but the reflection of ours toward them.
And again the boat appeared and the Fay, but about the attitude of the latter there was more of care and uncertainty and less of elastic joy.
They were all standing or sitting about in the most quaint and curious attitudes I have ever seen off a Japanese fan.
This indifferent, if not hostile, attitude on William's part made it impossible to break off without animosity, largely and completely.
Von Horn had attempted to sound the girl that he might, if possible, discover her attitude toward the work in which her father and he were engaged.
Norman of Torn could scarce repress a smile at this clever ruse of the old priest, and, assuming a similar attitude, he replied in French:
You are adopting an attitude, sir," he said, "which, however much I may admire it from one point of view, seems to me scarcely to take into account the facts of the situation.
He maintained a belligerent attitude toward all well-dressed men.
The attitude is unnatural, and I may say impossible.
His attitude had in it a suggestion of abstraction, like that of a sleepwalker.
Something in the attitude made the intruders halt when they had barely passed the threshold.
Its attitude is summed up in the words of the Muses to the writer of the "Theogony": `We can tell many a feigned tale to look like truth, but we can, when we will, utter the truth' ("Theogony"