Arthur Levitt


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Arthur Levitt

An American broker. He worked for a time as a broker for individual investors before becoming chairman of the American Stock Exchange. He was chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission from 1993 to 2001.
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criticized White's policy on granting waivers to securities law violators, and two previous SEC chairs, Arthur Levitt and William Donaldson, recently challenged the agency for its failure to issue a political spending disclosure rule despite receiving 1.
Arthur Levitt, former chairman of the US Securities and Exchange Commission, has said that he will step down as policy advisor for Goldman Sachs (NYSE: GS).
That history has included a vast array of leadership styles through recent chairs--Donaldson, Harvey Pitt, Arthur Levitt, Richard Breeden and David Ruder--each demonstrating a unique personality and arguably great achievement in improving financial reporting and accounting.
BEFORE HE MADE MILLIONS ton Wall Street and went on to become, under Bill Clinton, the longest-serving chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission in history (the one who famously attempted to reform notoriously resistant accounting standards), Arthur Levitt Jr.
Two years ago, the then-chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, Arthur Levitt Jr.
and Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt, Jr.
The well-known 370,000-square foot Arthur Levitt State Office building at 270 Broadway has been re-configured and will soon re-open as a mixed-use luxury residential condo-rental/office/retail property.
I'm concerned that some of the basic important fundamentals of investing are being lost on investors,'' said Arthur Levitt, chairman of the U.
While it has not been proved that any audit has been compromised by consultancy work, Arthur Levitt, the SEC chairman, is concerned that investor confidence in independent financial information will be threatened unless steps are taken to prove independence and integrity.
Chairman Arthur Levitt of the SEC said the rule--known as regulation FD (for "fair disclosure")--will "bring all investors, regardless of the size of their holdings, into the information loop, where they belong.
But the troth is that the Comptroller lost the great turf struggle of 1999: Chairman Alan Greenspan at the Fed and Chairman Arthur Levitt at the SEC ate the Comptroller's lunch.