Armed Islamic Group

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Armed Islamic Group

An Islamist group based in Algeria that has conducted terrorist activities since the early 1990s. In addition to civilian massacres within Algeria, it was responsible for the hijacking of an Air France flight in 1994.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to a GSPC communique, the change in leadership was designed to "reinforce the unity of the Salafist fighters and change the doctrinal and spiritual deviations that have occurred within the Armed Islamic Group.
See Amnesty International, Algeria: Civilians Caught between Two Fires (New York: Amnesty International, 1997); idem, Algeria: Civilian Population Caught in a Spiral of Violence (New York: Amnesty International, 1997); Armed Islamic Group, Communique issued 11 January 1995; idem, Communique issued 16 January 1995; idem, Communique issued 18 January 1995; idem, Al-Qital, bulletin 32 (1996); United Nations, Algeria: Report of Eminent Panel, July-August 1998 (New York: United Nations Department of Public Information, 1998).
The barefoot young woman sobbed as she recalled the massacre of her entire family by "terrorists" she assumed were from the Armed Islamic Group, the "GIA".
The new strategy of General Zeroual is to step up the war still further and defeat the fundamentalists on the ground in order, as some hope, totally to wipe out the armed Islamic groups.
Similarly, the random acts of violence inflicted upon the civilian population by the Armed Islamic Group since 1993 evoke urban guerrilla warfare waged by the F.
By-passing the changes that were made possible by the war of decolonization, the FIS as well as the Armed Islamic Group have insisted that women's roles in society be redefined according to a strict reading of the shari'a.
The Armed Islamic Group refined the art of violence while paying lip service to an eclectic assortment of practices combining neo-fundamentalist Sunni and Shiite traditions.
The banning of the FIS after the parliamentary elections 1991 is often invoked as the cause of the militarization of the FIS and the rise of its radical offshoot, the Armed Islamic Group.