Armed Islamic Group


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Armed Islamic Group

An Islamist group based in Algeria that has conducted terrorist activities since the early 1990s. In addition to civilian massacres within Algeria, it was responsible for the hijacking of an Air France flight in 1994.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Algerian Armed Islamic Group is in Seattle, San Diego, and Los Angeles.
180) In its brief to the immigration court, the INS claimed that its exhibits proved that the FIS and the Armed Islamic Group (GIA) were terrorist organizations, that Haddam was a member of both, and that he and they were waged in an "Islamic jihad.
The extremists of both camps - be that the hardline cadre of the Armed Islamic Group (GIA) or the "eradicators" on the regime's side - have continued with a spate of bloody attacks and retaliations, which by now has taken the lives of well over 100,000 people according to most estimates.
The government has offered full co-operation with the US after the bombing of the WTC and the Pentagon, and there has been intelligence sharing since then in light of the fact that the Al Qaida network had links with the Algerian militant groups like the Armed Islamic Group (GIA) among others.
The leader of the Armed Islamic Group, Algeria's most radical rebel movement, was killed yesterday in a gunfight with security forces near the Algerian capital.
This is reportedly the first route to Algeria served by a French airline since Air France and most international carriers halted services to the country after a hijacking on Christmas Eve in 1994 in which an Air France aircraft was hijacked by the Armed Islamic Group.
The major armed Islamic groups are the Islamic Salvation Army (connected to the FIS) and the extremist Armed Islamic Group (GIA).
The December 1994 hijacking of an Air France flight from Algiers was carried out by four members of the "Phalange of the Signers in Blood," a subsidiary of Algeria's Armed Islamic Group.
ALGERIA: The feared Armed Islamic Group are bent on overthrowing the Government and setting up an Islamic state.
Newsweek has learned from Canadian police sources that Ahmed Ressam, the man arrested in Washington state last week with a car full of bomb-making materials, is directly tied to a cell of a well-known Algerian extremist group, Armed Islamic Group (GIA).
Amir Ayoub's faction was part of the Armed Islamic Group, considered the most radical underground group fighting to topple Algeria's military-backed government.
An exceedingly militant faction, the Armed Islamic Group (GIA) now competes with the FIS Islamic Salvation Army for primacy of position in attacking government forces.