arbitrage

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Arbitrage

The simultaneous buying and selling of a security at two different prices in two different markets, resulting in profits without risk. Perfectly efficient markets present no arbitrage opportunities. Perfectly efficient markets seldom exist, but, arbitrage opportunities are often precluded because of transactions costs.

Arbitrage

An investment practice that attempts to profit from inefficiencies in price by making transactions that offset each other. For example, one may buy a security at a low price and, within a few seconds, re-sell it to a willing buyer at a higher price. Arbitrageurs can keep prices relatively stable as markets try to resist their attempts at price exploitation. Arbitrageurs often use computer programs because their transactions can be complex and occur in rapid succession.

arbitrage

The simultaneous purchase and sale of substantially identical assets in order to profit from a price difference between the two assets. As a hypothetical example, if General Electric common stock trades at $45 on the New York Stock Exchange and at $44.50 on the Philadelphia Stock Exchange, an investor could guarantee a profit by purchasing the stock on the Philadelphia Stock Exchange and simultaneously selling the same amount of stock on the NYSE. Of course, the price difference must be sufficiently great to offset commissions. Arbitrage may be employed by using various security combinations including stock and options and convertibles and stock. See also basis trading, risk arbitrage.

Arbitrage.

Arbitrage is the technique of simultaneously buying at a lower price in one market and selling at a higher price in another market to make a profit on the spread between the prices.

Although the price difference may be very small, arbitrageurs, or arbs, typically trade regularly and in huge volume, so they can make sizable profits.

But the strategy, which depends on split-second timing, can also backfire if interest rates, prices, currency exchange rates, or other factors move in ways the arbitrageurs don't anticipate.

arbitrage

the buying and selling of PRODUCTS, FINANCIAL SECURITIES or FOREIGN CURRENCIES between two or more markets in order to take profitable advantage of any differences in the prices quoted in those markets.

If the price of the same product is different, as between two markets, a dealer, by simultaneously buying in the lower-priced market and reselling in the higher-priced market, stands to make a profit on the transaction (allowing for dealing expenses). Arbitrage thus serves to narrow or eliminate price differentials between markets, with buying in the lower-priced market causing prices to rise there, and selling in the higher-priced market causing prices to fall. See SPOT MARKET, ARBITRAGEUR, SPECULATION, COVERED INTEREST ARBITRAGE.

arbitrage

the buying or selling of PRODUCTS, FINANCIAL SECURITIES or FOREIGN CURRENCIES between two or more MARKETS in order to take profitable advantage of any differences in the prices quoted in these markets. By simultaneously buying in a low-price market and selling in the high-price market a dealer can make a profit from any disparity in prices between them, though in the process of buying and selling the dealer will add to DEMAND in the low-price market and add to SUPPLY in the high-price market, so narrowing or eliminating the price disparity. See SPOT MARKET, FUTURES MARKET, COVERED INTEREST ARBITRAGE.

arbitrage

The simultaneous purchase in one market and sale in another market of a commodity, security,or monies,in the expectation of making a profit on price differences in the differing markets. Generally thought of as involving foreign currency exchanges,in which one enters contracts to buy euros and sell yen and hopefully make money in a moment in time when the exchange rates work out in one's favor (this is highly risky).

References in periodicals archive ?
1 present two scenarios to reinforce the idea that the arbitrage strategy and payoff is the same regardless of what specific prices and values the ETF and index take so long as the ratio between them is sufficiently below 100:1.
The arbitrage strategy to exploit such a severe deviation from the peg ratio in this direction is to short sell the 30 component stocks in the index and use those proceeds to buy the relatively undervalued ETF shares.
3) Low tax bracket investors will adopt the long arbitrage strategy or delay their sales until the ex date.
For low tax bracket investors, fewer investors will follow the delayed sale strategy, and there will be no clear-cut prediction on the number of investors following the long arbitrage strategy.
This result is consistent with Hypothesis 5, that institutions delay their sale or pursue a long arbitrage strategy, because dividend taxes are irrelevant for them and the expected return is positive.
Fewer investors will use the long arbitrage strategy if the expected return is higher than 2c/(1-c), which is approximately 0.
A true merger arbitrage strategy aims to capture the spread between a target company's stock price after a proposed merger or acquisition is announced and the price that the acquiring company will pay for the target company.
S&P Merger Arbitrage Index seeks to provide a merger arbitrage strategy that exploits commonly observed price changes associated with a global selection of publicly announced mergers, acquisitions and other corporate reorganizations.
Short Selling funds, as might be expected, reported further losses amid stocks' continued gains in August while Market Neutral Arbitrage strategy funds had another lackluster month.
As one would expect, Short Selling and Market Neutral Arbitrage strategy funds were among those performing best last month, while Value and Aggressive Growth funds underperformed.
Michael Revy adds: "Joining efforts with Froley, Revy will allow me to combine the quantitative aspect of a convertible arbitrage strategy with the depth of fundamental research that this firm has developed over the years.