Any Willing Provider Law


Also found in: Medical.

Any Willing Provider Law

In health care, a law requiring an insurer or a managed care organization to allow policyholders to receive treatment from any provider willing to accept the fee the insurer offers, even if he/she is not in the insurer's network of approved providers. About half of U.S. states have any willing provider statutes.
References in periodicals archive ?
AFTER A 10-YEAR BATTLE IN the federal court system, the any willing provider law appeared to be settled in 2005 when it went into effect.
There is also reason to believe that any willing provider laws were not actively enforced during the time period studied by the authors because of a court order in 1997 blocking Arkansas' broad-based any willing provider law, passed in 1995 (Crowley 2003; McLean and Richards 2003; Bleed 2004a).
If these fears are accurate, and we believe they are, then it is reasonable to expect health care costs to increase if the any willing provider law is adopted.
The state Legislature tried to foster more competition by enacting the any willing provider law in 1995, but it has never been enforced because a federal court found that it violated a provision of the federal Employment Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA).
Recently, the people who bottled up the any willing provider law in court have been at it again, claiming exclusive provider networks are the only way to save money for patients.
Supreme Court decision on Kentucky's any willing provider law doesn't apply to Arkansas.