Antiboycott Law

Antiboycott Law

A law that forbids companies in a country from boycotting foreign nations unless the domestic government authorizes it. It may also prohibit agreements deemed discriminatory on racial, gender, or other grounds. American antiboycott laws effectively prohibit American companies from refusing to do business with Israeli companies. However, this is no longer as important as it once was, as many Arab League countries no longer enforce their boycott of Israel.
References in periodicals archive ?
The other antiboycott law is the Ribicoff Amendment to the Tax Reform Act of 1976 (TRA76).
Because the United States does not wish to infringe on the right of any country to choose its own trading partners, the antiboycott laws do not target such boycotts.
Because the United States does not wish to infringe upon the right of any country to choose its own trading partners, the antiboycott laws do not target primary
antiboycott laws do in that a change in market position or terminating business in the boycotted country can create criminal liability.
antiboycott laws which prohibited firms from cooperating in the Arab boycott of Israel.
antiboycott laws, sanctions administered by the Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA).
Because the United States does not wish to infringe upon the right of any country to choose its own trading partners, the antiboycott laws do not target primary boycotts--limitations on the import and export of products from a specific country.
The Export Administration Act, enacted in 1969, was amended in 1977 to include the antiboycott laws.