Anti-Globalization

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Anti-Globalization

A movement that opposes free trade, free movement of capital, and other policies intended to facilitate international business. Various types of people oppose globalization. Labor unions in developed countries may oppose it because it represents a threat to traditional, industrial jobs. Other factions on the left believe globalization favors the wealthy at the expense of the poor and working class.
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Historical antecedents of the anti-globalisation movement
Jacobs began disrupting the Welsh anti-globalisation movement when he arrived in Cardiff in 2006.
They have been variously grouped together as the Global Justice Movement, the Movement of Movements, the anti-globalisation movement and the anti-capitalist globalisation movement.
It has been feared the protest could attract the more hard-line elements of the anti-globalisation movement.
The anti-globalisation movement is becoming more militant and gardai fear violence will erupt during the EU summit like it did on May Day.
In the final essay in this forum Buttel concludes that the anti-globalisation movement (AGM) is protesting much more than economic rationalisation.
AS THE Welsh Language Society celebrates its 40th birthday, it may be about to reinvent itself as part of the anti-globalisation movement.
After September 11, opinion makers began to associate the violent sector of the anti-globalisation movement with the global terrorist network.
11 terrorist attacks on the US and the recent activities of the anti-globalisation movement.
The study, "Business in a Fragile World," examines the impact that the rise of the anti-globalisation movement, the global economic downturn, the September 11th terrorist attacks and ensuing war on terrorism have had on the globalisation of business environment.
The same pundits who had previously dismissed the anti-globalisation movement were quick to proclaim it as dead, in tatters, or 'just so yesterday'.