Anti-Globalization

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Anti-Globalization

A movement that opposes free trade, free movement of capital, and other policies intended to facilitate international business. Various types of people oppose globalization. Labor unions in developed countries may oppose it because it represents a threat to traditional, industrial jobs. Other factions on the left believe globalization favors the wealthy at the expense of the poor and working class.
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This is what activists are fighting for in Egypt, in Croatia, in the peace movement, and the anti-globalization movement.
While these studies offer a diverse reading of contemporary women's organizing, none explicitly address the many feminist groups engaged in broader anarchist, queer, anti-capitalist and anti-globalization movements.
The increasingly popular anti-globalization movement has been most recently characterized by its disorganization and lack of cohesiveness.
While serving as a fruitful rallying point for those on the left of the political spectrum at the end of the 20th century, the anti-globalization movement got all dressed up but really had nowhere to go.
Three case studies make that point: the Islamist movement/s; the Palestinian solidarity movement; and the anti-globalization movement.
The band's stance on vegan-ism, the deconstruction of government and police oppression saw them heralded as forefathers to the anti-globalization movement.
Targeted companies responded by establishing codes of conduct and improving labor practices, but the anti-globalization movement served notice that high-profile brands carried risks.
Tracing the birth of the anti-globalization movement is difficult.
The small but vocal anti-globalization movement has pushed its message forward with great force and tenacity.
The topics examined include business productivity, global financial markets, cultural identity, the uses of the Internet in education and health, the anti-globalization movement, political processes, media and identity, and public policies to guide technological development.
The authors use the closing chapter to explain how the anti-globalization movement can advance from merely opposing the trend toward freer global trade to actively undermining and reversing that trend.
Naomi Klein, one of the most vocal spokespeople for the anti-globalization movement, sees the failure of governments to take an active role in guarding the welfare of their citizens in this scenario as a "betrayal" of "the fundamental need for democracies that are responsive and participatory.