Anticoercion Law

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Anticoercion Law

A law or clause within a law forbidding coercion (the use of threats, intimidation, or deceit to force an action) in insurance and other businesses. Most U.S. states have adopted a version of the NAIC Unfair Trade Practices Act, which includes an anticoercion law.
References in periodicals archive ?
North Dakota passed an anti-coercion law that requires abortion clinics to post a sign telling women that they cannot be forced into having an abortion and explaining where they can get help.
the Senate Appropriations Committee approved language to gut the Kemp-Kasten anti-coercion law.
The House and the White House also barred attempts to weaken the Kemp-Kasten Anti-Coercion Law, a key pro-life law that has blocked U.
Joseph Crowley (D-NY), to gut the anti-coercion law and restore U.
This law, known as the "Kemp-Kasten anti-coercion law," has been in effect for 18 years.
On July 22, the Bush Administration announced its conclusion that the UNFPA's support for China's program violates the Kemp-Kasten anti-coercion law, which has been in effect since 1985.
As a result of this and other evidence, the Bush Administration determined that the UNFPA remains in violation of the Kemp-Kasten anti-coercion law.
If resistance to the use of ultrasounds is intense, it pales in comparison to resistance to proposed anti-coercion laws.