Annual Gift Tax Exclusion

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Annual Gift Tax Exclusion

The value of the gift(s) an individual or married couple may give in a year without being subject to the gift tax. The amount of the annual gift tax exclusion varies from year to year but is always over $10,000. In general, payments for medical, educational, and political purposes fall under the annual gift tax exclusion no matter how much they are, as do gifts to one's spouse.
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Each year, the couple's annual gift tax exclusions would cover $28,000 of the $50,000 gift, reducing the amount they would report on a gift tax return and reducing the impact on their gift and estate tax exemptions.
In fact, it is sometimes possible to structure the trust's share of the premium to be lower than the allowable annual gift tax exclusions.
They filed timely gift tax returns that consistently claimed annual gift tax exclusions.
Finally, the Second Circuit rejected annual gift tax exclusions for over 40 checks a decedent wrote on her deathbed to family and friends.
in trust for child for life, remainder to grandchildren in continuing trust), the transferor must allocate a generation-skipping transfer (GST) exemption on a gift tax return to prevent a GST tax on distributions to such beneficiaries, even if the filing is not required for gift tax purposes because the gifts are within the grantor's annual gift tax exclusions.
Commissioner,[2] which has been construed by some to allow annual gift tax exclusions based on a contingent or "naked" Crummey power.
By claiming that the premium gift was a gift of a future interest, the IRS attempted to prevent these gifts from being considered part of the grantor's annual gift tax exclusions, subjecting the premium transfer to gift taxation in the year of the gift.
INDIVIDUALS OR COUPLES CANNOT USE THEIR ANNUAL gift tax exclusions to shelter QPRT transfers from tax.
The Service continues to attack the availability of annual gift tax exclusions for transfers to trusts containing Crummey(19) withdrawal rights.
On the estate tax return, the interests of the 16 contingent beneficiaries were treated as qualifying for 16 annual gift tax exclusions under IRC section 2503(b) with regard to the decedent's 1990 transfer of the commercial building to the trust.
The estate treated the interests of the contingent beneficiaries as qualifying for 16 annual gift tax exclusions, which the IRS disallowed on the grounds that the decedent and the beneficiaries had an understanding that the latter would not exercise their withdrawal rights.
Consistent with AOD 1996-010, the IRS argued that substance-over-form doctrine should apply to deny 16 of the annual gift tax exclusions claimed.

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