Annual Budget


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Annual Budget

A plan for an organization or company's expenditures for a fiscal year. Making an annual budget involves balancing an organization's revenue or income with its expenses. A budget is in balance if revenues equal expenditures, it is in deficit if the person or company must resort to borrowing to meet expenses, and it is in surplus if money is left over to be used for savings or expansion.
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Federal development spending in the first six months amounted to Rs248 billion or about one-fourth of the annual budget.
9 million in the annual budget of 2010-11 as against Rs 110 million in annual budget of 2009-10.
Before departing on a two-day official trip Wednesday afternoon to Indonesia, Hatoyama told reporters that his plan to finish drafting the annual budget by the end of the year has ''basically'' stayed unchanged.
Hence supplemental appropriations designated as emergency spending no longer count against the annual budget limits set by Congress and do not trigger automatic cuts if they push outlays above the caps.
Commission officials are also sceptical that an annual budget-setting process would produce a higher annual budget as many MEPs believe because the question of what is compulsory and what is optional spending is not laid down in EU law and would be the subject of political battles among the institutions.
Compiling an annual budget is time-consuming and requires great amounts of communication and thinking on the part of all participants.
A joint report by chief constable Norman Bettison and the police authority treasurer,Steve Houston, was approved at the annual budget meeting.
Cabinet member councillor Phil Robinson said youngsters were missing out if their school held back more than 10 per cent of its annual budget.
Webster is credited with helping to build ASCP into a leading pharmacy organization with more than 6,500 members and an annual budget of more than $8 million.
Data collected from more than 1,000 nonprofit organizations in 2001 indicate that, as might be expected, there is a strong positive relationship between the size of an association's full-time staff and the size of its total annual budget.
By 1930, the annual budget for federal road projects was $750 million.
Social Security Administration from 1993 to 1997, where she was responsible for 65,000 employees and an annual budget of more than $480 billion.

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