Andrew Fastow


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Andrew Fastow

The chief financial officer at Enron from 1998 until 2001. That year, it was revealed that many of Enron's assets were either overpriced or completely fictional; losses were hidden in offshore subsidies, and most profits were fraudulent. Fastow shared responsibility for much of this; he traded his testimony against co-conspirators in exchange for a lighter prison sentence. He was born in 1961.
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, the management team of Kenneth Lay, Jeffrey Skilling, and Andrew Fastow sold $800 million worth of their own Enron stock while cajoling their employees to invest 100% of their retirement savings in the company.
The most popular speaker at this year's conference was Andrew Fastow, the former CFO of Enron.
The most recent prominent example was the decision to charge the wife of Andrew Fastow in the Enron investigation.
Enron's former chief financial officer, Andrew Fastow, testified against both Skilling and Lay and was sentenced to six years in prison.
Besides the consolidation issue, Enron discussed their management and implied that Andrew Fastow had improperly sold his interests in LJM1 and LIM2 to Kopper without directors' approval of various transactions.
That company sold it back to Enron days later for $20million, with the trio sharing the profits with Andrew Fastow, Enron's chief financial officer, and another Enron employee.
Prominent previous recipients of SEC subpoena enforcements have included Enron s former chief financial officer Andrew Fastow and tobacco company RJ Reynolds.
At the heart of the Enron financial collapse lay three executives - chairman Kenneth Lay, chief executive officer Jeffrey Skilling and chief financial officer Andrew Fastow.
At the heart of the Enron financial scandal lay three executives - chairman Kenneth Lay, chief executive officer Jeffrey Skilling and chief financial officer Andrew Fastow.
5million and the rest was shared by Andrew Fastow, Enron's disgraced chief financial officer, and another employee.
Many experts would be surprised to learn, in all likelihood, that two-thirds of Enron employees were at one time or another aware of unethical behavior, and not at the hands of Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Ken Lay, CEO (briefly) Jeffrey Skilling or Chief Financial Officer Andrew Fastow, but rather by the mid-level executives and those reporting to them.
Kroger admits that prosecuting mob thugs led to a bit of paranoia in his personal life--"when I turned the key in my door, I always expected an explosion"--but he finds the fraud perpetrated by white collar Enron criminals like Andrew Fastow, in some ways, even more objectionable than those of mafia murderers.