Andrew Carnegie


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Andrew Carnegie

An American early industrialist. He began working at a factory as a boy and ascended the corporate ladder until he founded Carnegie Steel Company, which later became U.S. Steel. Believed by many to be one of the richest men in history, he became a philanthropist in later life and gave away most of his money. Critics claim he was an opponent of organized labor who paid his employees poorly under harsh working conditions. His supporters contend he lived the American dream, rising from poverty to wealth through hard work and dedication. He lived from 1835 to 1919. See also: Robber Baron.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
OUR CRITICS ARE JUST TROLLS Darren and Andrew Carnegie have defended their approach and insisted they can account for all the donations they receive.
PLANS: The Carnegie library in Lister Drive, Tuebrook; and, right, philanthropist Andrew Carnegie Main picture: JAMES MALONEY
Andrew Carnegie will have a room at Central Library named in his honour at a ceremony led by the mayor of Sandwell, Coun Gurcharan Sidhu, on Monday.
Designed by Lamb & Rich, and later rebuilt by Ralph Samuel Townsend supported by funds from Andrew Carnegie, the educational facilities support lectures and classes for crafts and trades.
Highly readable despite its length, Andrew Carnegie shows signs of prodigious original research on almost every page.
That courage was exactly the kind industrialist Andrew Carnegie was looking to reward when he founded the Carnegie Hero Fund Commission in 1904.
The Carnegie Performing Arts Center's 30th Nutcracker takes place in the historic Andrew Carnegie Free Library in Carnegie, PA.
Characters include McKinley and his suffering wife Ida; William Randolf Hearst, unscrupulous newsman who urges the removal of McKinley; Mark Hanna, king maker, who raises millions from businessmen and buys the presidency; Emma Goldman, anarchist and advocate of free love; Ambrose Bierce, fiery newsman who writes for Hearst; Andrew Carnegie and Henry Clay Frick, men of steel who have striking workers shot; William Jennings Bryan, McKinley's political rival; and flamboyant vice president Teddy Roosevelt.
Andrew Carnegie remains the best example of the rags-to-riches story from a century which loved them.
By mounting an exhibition of these furnishings by artists entitled Design [not equal to] Art, the Smithsonian's Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum poses a challenging question to viewers within the domestic splendour of its galleries in the former Andrew Carnegie mansion on New York's Fifth Avenue.