Amicus Curiae

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Amicus Curiae

Latin for "friend of the court." A person who is not a party to a case but offers expert or other relevant information on a point of law in order to help the judge or jury make a decision. An amicus curiae may offer testimony (provided it is unsolicited by either party in the case) or write a brief or legal treatise on the matter at hand. The court has full discretion whether or not to accept the statement of an amicus curiae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additional financial support is provided annually by NIMLO, which participates in the activities of the Legal Center and signs on to the Legal Center's amicus briefs.
Amicus briefs generally are filed by entities that are considered authorities on certain topics as a way to educate and inform the courts.
109) A case was coded as citing an amicus brief if there was any reference to the brief in the opinion--it did not necessarily require a full citation to the brief.
Implicit in the Board's unanimous vote to approve the filing of the amicus brief is the notion that the Board waived by a two-thirds vote the requirement that it determine the divisiveness of the issue," Pariente wrote.
On the other side, groups of university faculty members, notably law and economics professors, have signed amicus briefs in support of a broad exemption.
The USCCB filed an amicus brief opposing Oregon's Measure 16, which legalized assisted suicide.
On the other side of the issue, Wine Institute President Bobby Koch said that an amicus brief against direct shipping by the Bush Administration would constitute a "a position against free trade.
If so, businesses should be aware of the protocol for filing such a brief and how they go about getting the association to file an amicus brief in a particular case.
announced that 35 attorneys general, supported by 43 state bank commissioners, have filed an amicus brief in support of Connecticut Banking Commissioner John P.
The next several minutes, and the first several minutes of Solicitor General Theodore Olson's argument, were devoted to addressing the retired officers' amicus brief.
Justice Department civil rights division filed an amicus brief June 11 in federal court supporting the fellowship.