Amicus Curiae

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Amicus Curiae

Latin for "friend of the court." A person who is not a party to a case but offers expert or other relevant information on a point of law in order to help the judge or jury make a decision. An amicus curiae may offer testimony (provided it is unsolicited by either party in the case) or write a brief or legal treatise on the matter at hand. The court has full discretion whether or not to accept the statement of an amicus curiae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bevins amicus brief argues in support of Hands-On, stating that, from its earliest days, the Commonwealth of Kentucky has been a haven for those seeking to live out their religious beliefs.
This section of the Defense Counsel Journal is dedicated to highlighting recent amicus briefs so that the Journal's readers can benefit from the insights presented therein.
In the amicus brief, the companies' argued the decision by the Pennsylvania judge "invites foreign nations to reciprocate by likewise demanding that local offices of U.
While Lynn isn't barring the filing of amicus briefs in the three Texas suits, which were consolidated, she "seemed to be expressing concern at providing an open invitation to submit briefs, and cautioning potential submitters to think twice about submitting," says Micah Hauptman, financial services counsel at the Consumer Federation of America.
The committee is composed of experienced forensic and accounting professionals who review case submissions and, based on certain criteria, determine whether to file an amicus brief.
The amicus brief, jointly filed by ACA, the National Association of Manufacturers, the American Petroleum Institute, the Organization for International Investment, and the Metals Service Center Institute, maintains that the case presents an important question of whether an agency may reinterpret a consent decree to expand its authority beyond its statutory limits and beyond the territorial jurisdiction of the United States.
There are two ways to prevent repetition among amicus briefs.
65) Particularly when an amicus brief has been informally submitted, some courts may not have the capacity to interpret and apply its contents correctly.
Additionally, one dissenting opinion (1) and one concurring opinion (2) cited an amicus brief.
See the letter from Michael Delaney, the New Hampshire attorney general, thanking NDAA for its amicus brief supporting the state's position.
IFA's amicus brief was prepared with the support of counsel at Nixon Peabody LLP.