Amicus Curiae

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Amicus Curiae

Latin for "friend of the court." A person who is not a party to a case but offers expert or other relevant information on a point of law in order to help the judge or jury make a decision. An amicus curiae may offer testimony (provided it is unsolicited by either party in the case) or write a brief or legal treatise on the matter at hand. The court has full discretion whether or not to accept the statement of an amicus curiae.
References in periodicals archive ?
The amicus brief, jointly filed by ACA, the National Association of Manufacturers, the American Petroleum Institute, the Organization for International Investment, and the Metals Service Center Institute, maintains that the case presents an important question of whether an agency may reinterpret a consent decree to expand its authority beyond its statutory limits and beyond the territorial jurisdiction of the United States.
Amicus briefs constitute a fundamental departure from the traditionally adversarial methods of common law courts.
4th DCA 2010), that it requested and received amicus briefs from the Real Property Probate and Trust Law Section of The Florida Bar and The Florida Bar Consumer Protection Law Committee, expressed gratitude for their assistance, and summarized their arguments along with the parties' arguments.
If you have any questions regarding NAA's Amicus Brief Program or the process of applying for amicus assistance, please contact John McDermott at jmcdermott@naahq.
As a byproduct of these studies, several theories have emerged concerning the manner in which amicus briefs affect the decisionmaking process of courts.
10(a)(3) provides that sections of the Bar may not submit an amicus brief in pending litigation if the issue "carries the potential of deep philosophical or emotional division among a substantial segment of the membership of the Bar.
Amicus briefs that provide this type of information, according to Justice Duggan, "tend to illuminate the historic and national perspectives involved in a case before the court.
Supreme Court amicus briefs are unique documents that pose strategic and often new challenges to even the most experienced appellate advocate.
Some amicus briefs are more helpful than others, but that should go to their weight, rather than their admissibility, so to speak," Fiedler said.
The disclosure requirement does not apply to amicus briefs submitted on behalf of federal, state, or local governments.
The clerks analyzed a large number of Legal Center amicus briefs and compared them with the other briefs filed in those cases and the opinions ultimately issued by the Court.
Several groups and organizations filed amicus briefs last week in support of the lawsuit filed by TCF National Bank ("TCF"), a subsidiary of TCF Financial Corporation (NYSE: TCB), challenging the constitutionality of the Durbin Amendment of the Dodd-Frank Act.