Amakudari


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Amakudari

The practice in which a senior Japanese bureaucrat retires from the civil service and takes an executive position at a private company. The former bureaucrat's personal and professional ties to the former position are thought to help the company receive information or favors. Amakudari generally occurs between ages 50 and 60. The word is Japanese for "descent from heaven."
References in periodicals archive ?
It is hard to avoid the conclusion that, in part, these centres were designed to create amakudari positions for police officers.
In Japan, the term amakudari denotes the widespread practice of senior officials taking up positions upon retiring from government.
In a similar vein, van Rixtel (2002) also argues that an amakudari bank can maximize its own economic rents by manipulating established relationships with monetary regulators to its competitive advantage.
Amakudari (''descent from heaven''), the practice of giving senior regulators jobs at the helm of industry, has been stopped.
There has been consensus on aims since the 1950s, and tight-knit personal contacts are reinforced by amakudari, revolving doors between government and business, and shared interests and ideas.
Adding to the unease were foreign press reports that, via the so-called amakudari system, the power company and the Ministry for Economy were in bed together.
Throughout the Asia-Pacific, critical decisions and policies pertaining to national security--particularly arms procurement, doctrine, and force structure--are commonly made by small, insular groups of military officers, career civilian defense officials, defense industry representatives, and private advisers (many of whom are ex-military men or former bureaucrats, a pattern known in Japan as amakudari, or literally "descent from heaven").
In a similar context, Horiuchi and Shimizu (1998) propose a simple model of repeated games to show that the regulatory authorit ies utilize monitoring as a tool of obtaining the self-enforcing amakudari relationship (a job turnover from a ministry into a private business known as descent from heaven) with private banks at the expense of stringent supervision.
Indirect incentives may come through regulators understanding that cooperative behavior may be rewarded with lucrative employment opportunities in the industry after leaving the government, a practice so common in the past with Japanese Ministry of Finance officials that it is euphemistically called amakudari, the "descent from heaven.
In a land where the led are reluctant to be leaders, the high-fliers who have achieved prominence in the civil service and private commerce, are, on retirement invited to become advisors on all matters; the Japanese call the process amakudari ('descending from heaven').
Another infamous Japanese practice van Wolferen deplores without picking up on the Western parallels is amakudari, or "descent from heaven," whereby senior bureaucrats retire to join firms they once helped to regulate.
We will eliminate vertical segmentation within ministries and agencies and enhance government functions, while also implementing full-scale efforts in such areas as the banning amakudari (golden parachuting) by national civil servants.