alligator

(redirected from Alligators)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Alligator

An option spread with unusually large commissions for the involved broker(s). In an alligator, the commissions are so large that the potential profit from the spread is not worth the expense. In such a situation, the investor holding the spread is said to be "eaten alive."

alligator

An option spread in which the commissions are so large a part of any potential profit that the investor gets eaten alive. Obviously, alligator spreads are of greater benefit to the broker than to the investor.
References in classic literature ?
He passed the scarlet alligator and came here of his own free will and accord.
The owl-man led him back down the mountain path and ordered the scarlet alligator to crawl away and allow the Nome to cross the bridge in safety.
Skins are sourced carefully from farmed American Louisiana alligators, which are listed as being of "Least Concern" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
Dubai: Two rare albino alligators have joined over 65,000 marine animals at Atlantis, The Palm's The Lost Chambers Aquarium.
Two albino alligators have taken up residence in the Lost Chambers Aquarium at Atlantis, The Palm, currently home to more than 65,000 marine animals.
Tommie Woodward, 28, reportedly ignored signs warning of alligators and jumped into a bayou in Orange, Texas, early Friday before being attacked by one of the animals and killed.
How Alligator Got His Smile Back" is an excellent storytelling resource for teaching grades K-3 the scientific observation of the development of two different, related species, frogs and alligators.
London, June 19 ( ANI ): Daredevil Christopher Gillette, works at a Florida sanctuary, which rescues alligators if they walk off in the city where residents can legally kill them.
Since the inception of the alligator program in 1972, over 904,000 wild alligators have been harvested, over 7.
She said a licensed reptile expert will care for the animal until it can be taken to Florida, where it will live in the type of environment where alligators can thrive.
Larger alligators have been trapped in Florida, weighing up to 1,000 pounds (454 kg), and one last year measured 14-feet.
Hudson told Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission investigators that he was aware of alligators in the park's rivers but had never seen one before.