Alfred P. Sloan Jr.

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Alfred P. Sloan Jr.

An American businessman (1875-1966) who was president and chairman of the board for General Motors. He began his career as president of Hyatt Roller Bearing, which made ball bearings. In 1916, this company merged with United Motors Company, which became part of GM two years later. Sloan remained at GM for the rest of his career and became president in 1937. Sloan is believed to have been the first to change designs of car models from year to year. This concept became known as planned obsolescence. He was also a noted philanthropist; however, he was accused of assisting Nazis during World War II.
References in periodicals archive ?
Balaji has been awarded the Alfred Sloan Fellowship, the Erlang Prize, the Rollo Davidson Prize, and the IEEE Innovation in Social Infrastructure Award.
Berlin/Detroit: Ulrich Hackenberg isn't yet a household name but if Volkswagen's (VW) $70 billion bet on his big idea pays off, he may join the likes of Henry Ford, Alfred Sloan and Taiichi Ohno in the canon of auto industry pioneers.
The 1st wave was in the 1920s where Alfred Sloan from General Motors established the concept of organizational structure; the 2nd wave was in the 1950s when Peter Drucker codified the role of management; the 3rd wave was in the 1980s when Japanese business brought forth the concept of team; and now the 4th wave is a new type of company which links profit with purpose.
Meanwhile, his rival at GM, Alfred Sloan, saw a market opportunity--providing consumers with a choice of colors and designs.
Founded in 1908, GM rose to dominate the US and global car industries under the stewardship of Alfred Sloan, its then chief executive, who famously pledged the firm would deliver "a car for every purse and purpose".
Pelfrey tells the story of Billy Durant, GM's founder, and Alfred Sloan, his successor, and their work to build the company, and its relationship with Henry Ford, Ransom Olds, Henry Leland, Walter Chrysler, and others in the auto industry, focusing on the first quarter of the twentieth century.
The latter will be the youngest head of GM since Mr Alfred Sloan, who took over the company in the 1920s.
Alfred Sloan (1875-1966) was responsible for the success of the American car manufacturer General Motors (GM), which grew to be the largest organisation the world had seen.
After a year as an Alfred Sloan Fellow at MIT with a freshly minted master's degree in management, he took hold of the 100-year-old corporation and turned it "upside down and inside out.
Ashish has an MBA from UCLA and a BS/BA in Computer Science and Economics from Grinnell College, IA, where he was a Phi Beta Kappa scholar and the recipient of the Robert Noyce Fellowship award and two Alfred Sloan Scholarships to drive solar-based refrigeration projects in India and eco-tourism activities in Costa Rica.
He was also an Alfred Sloan Fellow at MIT and a Fellow of Public Policy & Management at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government for one year.
He actually provides an example of a very successful automotive company that prospered by being comparatively decentralized: General Motors during the period when Alfred Sloan was running the corporation, when there were individual divisions with their own P & L.